Safety Whitepapers


Breaking down OSHA’s HAZCOM Requirements

Summary

Chemicals are a part of everyone’s life. There are five to seven million different chemicals known in the world. At least 400 million tons of chemicals are produced worldwide each year including agricultural chemicals, food additives, pharmaceuticals, fuels for power production, chemical consumer products, etc.

The frightening reality is for the vast majority of these chemicals, little or nothing is known about their possible immediate or long-term effects on the health of the workers who produce them or use them. According to OSHA, each year illnesses from exposure to these chemicals kill nearly 50,000 people.

To help protect workers, OSHA requires employers to establish a comprehensive hazcom safety training program addressing workplace specific chemicals. These policies are proven to reduce the likelihood of injury and save employers billions.

(more…)


Aerial Lift Safety Made Easy

OSHA Compliant Aerial Lift Training

Nearly 250,000 crane operators, other industry workers, and non-construction working individuals are at risk of suffering serious injury or death in aerial lift accidents each year. An annual study conducted by the Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety in 2010, revealed that the direct cost to employers from injuries in 2008 was $53.42 billion. Furthermore, the study concluded that accidents at the workplace were estimated to cost employers an additional $80 to $200 billion annually. To limit injury and death OSHA has instituted a strict policy dealing with aerial lifts. Therefore, aerial lift training is critical.

Through this aerial lift training, OSHA requires implementing standard emergency procedures, training for usage, maintaining lifts properly, providing the proper personal protection equipment and more. These training policies have proven to reduce the likelihood of injury and save employers billions.

Different Types of Aerial Lifts

An aerial lift is a device that enables access to hard-to-reach places by lifting a platform into the air. These devices give workers temporary access to otherwise inaccessible locations. The devices are easy to use and are typically safer to use than ladders and scaffolds. These devices are usually powered by electricity, gas, pneumatic or hydraulic systems that power a series of supports, lifting the work platform.

Common types of aerial work platforms include the cherry picker or bucket truck and the scissor lift. These devices are distinguishable by the type of platform used to lift workers.

Scissor Lifts

The scissor lift is an industrial lift modified for retail and wholesale settings. The lift features a platform that rises when the linked, folding supports underneath it draw together, stretching it upward. These lifts can reach from 21 to 62 feet above ground. In addition to moving horizontally, the lifts can move vertically as well. The lifts are typically powered by an electric motor.

Bucket Trucks and Cherry Pickers

Cherry pickers and bucket trucks are types of aerial lifts containing a fiberglass or steel platform (bucket) secured to a hydraulic or electric lifting system, which includes the lifting arm(s) (boom), and a rotating turret. These arms are mounted to trucks, vans, trailers and other motorized devices. The system is designed to lift personnel into the air safely, allowing them to perform work. Some bucket trucks are also equipped with a material handling winch designed to lift materials and supplies. These lifts are used in a variety of industries, the most common being electric utility, telecommunications, lights and signs, and vegetation management.

The Hazards of Aerial Lifts

Tampa, Fla., May 2011 – An electrical contractor in a bucket truck was killed after being shocked while working on a transformer. He sustained life-threatening injuries when he came in contact with a live wire. He was taken to a hospital where he later died.

Tunica, La., April 2011 -A 38-year-old man was killed after the aerial lift he was operating overturned and crushed him. The equipment overturned while on a slight incline.

Crane accidents are one of the leading causes of death and injury in the construction industry. About 26 die each year, with more than half of the deaths involving boom-supported lifts, such as bucket trucks and cherry pickers, with the others involving scissor lifts.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), these deaths account for 17% of fatal injuries in U.S. construction, but the proportion of injuries actually involving construction vehicles and equipment is probably greater.

A study of OSHA reports by Hinze and Bren (1996) found that cranes were reported to be involved in 108 (38%) of 284 fatal electrical injuries in the construction industry that involved heavy equipment. Types of Crane & Aerial Lift Injuries. [1] Serious injuries and death from crane accidents occur due to:

  • Crane collapses
  • Tip overs
  • Crane design defects
  • Overloading
  • Falling equipment
  • Dropped loads from poor rigging
  • Working in high winds
  • Electrocutions from high voltage electrical wire contact
  • Spills
  • Injuries during erection or dismantling of the crane
  • Falls
  • Lack of inspections
  • Mechanical failure
  • Operator error
  • Negligence
  • Inadequately trained or certified crane operators

Injuries Cost Employers Billions

While the sheer number of injuries is staggering, the financial impact they place on employers is overwhelming. An annual study conducted by the Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety in 2010, revealed that the direct cost to employers from injuries in 2008 was $53.42 billion. [2] Furthermore, the study concluded that accidents at the workplace cost employers an estimated additional $80 to $200 billion annually.

A second report by the U.S. Department of Labor cemented the findings of the insurance groups report. This report stated the average workplace injury cost an employer $43,000. The same study estimated the cost from wage replacement due to injury to be roughly $50 billion a year. “An accident at the workplace can often be the difference between operating in the black and falling into the red,” said Safety Services CEO Devon Dickenson.

Requirements of Aerial Lifts

Both the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) have a series of rules designed to protect employees using aerial lifts. American National Standards Institute requires that aerial lifts be inspected before use. Inspections are required to ensure all controls operate properly, and that the equipment is free of defects. ANSI also specifies that:

  • Equipment only be moved or adjusted when the aerial lift is in the retracted or grounded position
  • Brakes must always be set to lock the equipment into place when workers are lifted
  • Workers are to remain within the confines of the lift at all times during operation
  • They must wear the proper fall protection equipment

While the regulations of ANSI are only recommendations, OSHA has in place a series of requirements that all employers using aerial lifts must abide to. These regulations are CFR’s 1926.453, 1926.454, 1926.451, 1926.452, and 1926.454.

These OSHA safety requirements for aerial lift certification include securing the boom or ladder in the stored position when the vehicle is in motion, employees must have a body harness and lanyard attached to the bucket or boom, and obeying weight limits of the boom and bucket posted by the manufacturer. OSHA says a qualified person must train all users. The training must include:

  • Any electrical, fall, and falling-object hazards
  • Procedures for dealing with hazards
  • How to operate the lift correctly
  • Manufacturer requirements
  • Personal Protection Equipment
  • Positioning
  • Fall Protection

The Benefits of Safety Training

While the blow of a workplace injury is crippling to many companies, aerial lift safety training programs are proven to drastically reduce the risk of injury and increase workplace productivity. Through independent studies, OSHA has confirmed employers who have in place a safety and health training program experience a 52 percent lower rate of “injury with days away” than employers without a program. [3] A second study of private industry employers by OSHA found even more benefits to a safety training program.

Here are a few highlights of those programs: Company Benefits: [4]

  • Average Sales rose 7.5 percent
  • Manufacturing defects and waste dropped from $2.7 million in 2001 to $435,000 in 2005
  • Improved decision-making
  • EMR dropped by 45%

Safety and health also make big reductions in indirect costs, due to: [4]

  • Increased productivity
  • Higher quality products
  • Increased morale
  • Better labor/management relations
  • Reduced turnover
  • Better use of human resources

The value of training is further emphasized by a study of 41 workers hospitalized for hand injuries. Through the survey of these employees conducted by members of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) it was discovered more than half had no on the job training for the equipment that caused their injury.

Workplaces that establish safety and health management systems can reduce their injury and illness costs by 20 to 40 percent, according to OSHA. A NIOSH study of 55 confined workplace fatalities found that only three of those losing their lives ever received training on the proper workplace safety procedures. A study of the California insurance industry also revealed that every dollar invested in safety training resulted in $3 or more dollars in savings.

Safety training is not a cost, it is an investment.

There Is a Better Solution

By requesting and reading this report, you are no doubt aware of the hazards associated with aerial lifts and the long list of regulations your company must abide by. Meeting these regulations is a tedious process requiring you either develop a training program yourself or to outsource with expensive safety consultants.

There is, however, a better solution.

Here at Safety Services, we have developed a “Do-It-Yourself” aerial lift training program that is both simple to administer and fulfills all your OSHA requirements. This innovative kit features an Interactive Training Program, Student’s Handbook, Instructor’s Handbook, OSHA Regulations, Student Tests, Training Logs, Fall Protection Checklist, Certificates, Wallet Cards and More.

Topics addressed:

  • OSHA requirements
  • Manuals
  • Safety decals and information
  • PPE
  • Inspections
  • Start-up
  • Operation
  • Hazards
  • Maneuvering
  • Maintenance
  • And much more

Three Simple Steps to Certification

Our $499.99 kit is a simple three-step solution that brings all your employees into compliance.

1. Classroom/online training – The first step of our program is an intuitive electronic training session. Furthermore, through the program, employees navigate an electronic training program at a computer and then take an automatically graded test.

2. Field training – The second part of training is in the field. During this portion of the session, your appointed trainer shows the trainee the infield applications of the materials they learned in the classroom session.

3. Evaluation – The third step to the training session is evaluation. Through this step, the trainer evaluates the trainee and either signs off on certification or retouches on topics that need more work. Above all, certification through the program meets or exceeds OSHA requirements.

In addition to meeting training requirements, the scissor lift training kit also provides instruction on how to craft your aerial lifts written policy. However, if you are not comfortable writing your own policy we can provide the service for an additional fee.

Accordingly, please call (877) 201-8923 today to speak with one of our safety solutions experts.

Citations

This publication does not itself alter or determine compliance responsibilities, in other words, OSHA sets standards themselves and the Occupational Safety and Health Act. Moreover, because interpretations and enforcement policy may change over time, for additional guidance on OSHA compliance requirements, the reader should consult current and administrative interpretations and decisions by the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission and the Courts.

New OSHA Training Requirements for Confined Spaces

OSHA Confined Space Training Requirements

Many workplaces contain spaces considered “confined” because their configurations hinder the activities of employees who must enter, work in and exit them.

A confined space by definition has limited or restricted means for entry or exit, and it is not designed for continuous employee occupancy. Examples of confined spaces include underground vaults, tanks, storage bins, manholes, pits, silos, process vessels, and pipelines.

In addition to standard confined spaces, OSHA uses the term “permit-required confined space” to describe a confined space that has one or more of the following characteristics: contains or has the potential to contain a hazardous atmosphere; contains a material that has the potential to engulf an entrant; has walls that converge inward or floors that slope downward and taper into a smaller area, which could trap or asphyxiate an entrant; or contains any other recognized safety or health hazard such as unguarded machinery, exposed live wires, or heat stress.

Emergency Training Procedures

Nationwide there are a combined 6 million workplaces with confined spaces. To limit incidents of injury and death OSHA has instituted a strict policy dealing with confined spaces. Through this policy, OSHA requires implementing standard emergency procedure training for entrants, attendants and supervisors.

Plant management is required to have fully trained rescue teams ready to respond to any situation. Other requirements include identifying hazards in confined spaces, defining your workplace-confined spaces and setting up a permit policy. In addition to the increase of workplace injury by not having a policy in place, a citation for non-compliance carries penalties of $70,000 per occurrence, and it is expected that numerous fines will be imposed on businesses committing serious violations.

Your Specific Confined Spaces Requirement

The Final Rule for Permit-Required Confined Spaces was published in the Federal Register on January 14, 1993, and became effective on April 15, 1993. This standard (29 CFR1910.146) was based on years of gathering information on confined space fatalities and testimony about the hazards of confined spaces from all sectors of industry and labor. Because it applies to all of general industry, a performance-oriented standard was developed rather than a specification standard.

OSHA notes, by their very nature and configuration, many permit spaces contain atmospheres that, “unless adequate precautions are taken, are immediately dangerous to life and health (IDLH)”. For example, many confined spaces are poorly ventilated – a condition that creates an oxygen-deficient atmosphere and allows the accumulation of toxic gases.

It is your obligation as an employer to evaluate your workplace to determine if any spaces are permit-required confined spaces.

Permit Required Confined Spaces

You must first determine whether a space is a confined space. If it is a confined space, then you must determine if it is a permit-required confined space. Next, if it is a permit-required confined space, then you must determine whether full permit entry rules apply or less restrictive alternative entry rules apply.

If you determine your employees will enter permit-required confined spaces, then you must develop a written confined space entry program and training plan. This program/plan needs to be available for inspection by employees and their authorized union representatives.

How to Plan

The following are some aspects the program/plan must include:

  • Measures to prevent unauthorized entry
  • Identification and evaluation of the hazards of permit spaces
  • Equipment needed to perform a safe entry operation
  • Procedures for atmospheric testing of the space
  • Provision of at least one attendant outside the space
  • Provision for responding to emergencies
  • Designation of all persons with active roles and provision of required training
  • Procedures for summoning rescue and emergency services
  • System for the preparation, issuance, use and cancellation of entry permits
  • Procedures to coordinate operation where more than one employer is involved
  • Procedure for evaluation and correction of entry operations when the employer has reason to believe that the program is not sufficiently protective;
  • The mechanism by which the confined space permit entry program is reviewed

If your confined spaces don’t require permits, or employees will not be allowed access, you must develop a training program that teaches what constitutes a confined space, the hazards that may be encountered inside them, and the precautions that must be taken by confined space entrants, attendants, and supervisors to prevent accidents and injuries. You also need to develop a testing policy for the confined spaces atmospheric conditions and have a rescue policy in place if someone becomes stuck in a confined space.

Prevent Injuries and Increase Productivity

While the blow of a workplace injury cripples many companies, safety training programs are proven to drastically reduce the risk of injury and increase workplace productivity.

Through independent studies, OSHA has confirmed employers who have in place a safety and health training program experience a 52 percent lower rate of “injury with days away” than employers without a program. [2]

A second study of private industry employers by OSHA found even more benefits to a safety training program.

Here are a few highlights of those programs:

Company Benefits: [3]

  • Average Sales rose 7.5 percent
  • Manufacturing defects and waste dropped from $2.7 million in 2001 to $435,000 in 2005
  • Improved decision-making
  • EMR dropped by 45%

NIOSH Findings

The value of training is further emphasized by a study of 41 workers hospitalized for hand injuries. Through the survey of these employees conducted by members of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), it was discovered more than half had no on-the-job training for the equipment that caused their injury.

Workplaces that establish safety and health management systems can reduce their injury and illness costs by 20 to 40 percent, according to OSHA.

Studies not only show the impact safety training has in increasing productivity and preventing injury. It shows the value training has to prevent casualties. [4]

A NIOSH study of 55 confined workplace fatalities found that only three of those losing their lives ever received training on the proper workplace safety procedures.

A study of the California insurance industry also revealed that every dollar invested in safety training resulted in $3 or more dollars in savings.

Safety training is not a cost, it is an investment.

There is a Better Solution

Meeting these regulations is a tedious process requiring you to either to develop a training program yourself or to outsource with expensive safety consultants.

There is a better solution.

Here at Safety Services we have developed a “Do-It-Yourself” training program that is both simple to administer and fulfills all your OSHA requirements.

This innovative kit features an Interactive Training Program, Student’s Handbook, Instructor’s Handbook, OSHA Regulations, Student Tests, Training Logs, Fall Protection Checklist, Certificates, Wallet Cards and More.

Topics addressed:

  • OSHA requirements
  • Manuals
  • Safety decals and information
  • PPE
  • Inspections
  • Start-up
  • Operation
  • Hazards
  • Maneuvering
  • Maintenance
  • And much more

Three Simple Steps to Certification

Our $449.99 kit is a simple three-step solution that brings all your employees into compliance.

1. Classroom/online training
The first step of our program is an intuitive electronic training session. Through the program, employees navigate an electronic training program at a computer and then take an automatically graded test.

2. Field training
The second part of training is in the field. During this portion of the session, your appointed trainer shows the trainee the infield applications of the materials they learned in the classroom session.

3. Evaluation
The third step to the training session is evaluation. Through this step, the trainer evaluates the trainee. Then, either signs off on certification or retouches on topics that need more work. All certification through the program meets OSHA requirements.

In addition to meeting training requirements, the kit provides instruction on how to craft your confined spaces written policy. If you are not comfortable writing your own policy we can provide the service for an additional fee.

Call (877) 201-8923 today to speak with one of our safety solutions experts.

Citations

This publication does not itself alter or determine compliance responsibilities, which are set forth in OSHA standards themselves and the Occupational Safety and Health Act. Moreover, because interpretations and enforcement policy may change over time, for additional guidance on OSHA compliance requirements, the reader should consult current and administrative interpretations and decisions by the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission and the Courts.

Spilling the Truth on Bloodborne Pathogen Safety

Summary

Bloodborne pathogens are defined as microorganisms in the blood or other body fluids that can cause illness and disease. These microorganisms are transmitted through the eyes, skin, nose or mouth, also known as mucous membranes, or under the skin by means of puncture. Exposure can result from cuts or puncture wounds caused by sharp objects, such as blades, needles, or knives. There is also risk of exposure in a situation where blood or body fluid is splashed on open cuts or mucous membranes.

The most common diseases caused by exposure are hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). People who carry bloodborne pathogens may not be aware that they are infected.

In March 1992 OSHA adopted a bloodborne pathogen training policy (CFR 1910.1030) designed to limit exposure to blood and other bodily fluids at the workplace. The policy was initially tailored for hospitals, funeral homes, nursing homes, clinics, law enforcement agencies, emergency responders, and HIV/HBV research laboratories. However, the standard grew to cover any employer where there is a reasonable chance of exposure to bloodborne pathogens.

Compliance with the standard requires employers to have in place a policy and training plan dealing with the hazards of bloodborne pathogens, vaccination, handling and more. Through independent studies OSHA has confirmed employers who have a safety and health training program in place experience a 52 percent lower rate of “injury with days away” than employers without a program.

(more…)


Inoculating Your Business Against Drug/Alcohol With a Substance Abuse Prevention Program

Summary

A well kept secret of drug users in America is they are largely employed. Of the 16.6 million adult illicit drug users in 2002, 12.4 million (74.6 percent) were employed full or part time. [1] Most binge and heavy alcohol users were also employed. Among the 51.1 million adult binge drinkers, 40.8 million (80 percent) are employed either full or part time [1]

The economic and human costs include: losses in productivity, employers paying out claims, lost days on the job, and reduction in productivity. Substance abuse causes: accidents, injuries and death, time off, tardiness, dismissal, more drug use, theft, and poor performance. Addressing these problems with a Drug Free Workplace Program (DFWP) has proven to improve performance for employees and employers. In addition, 12 states provide mandated insurance company discounts when an DFWP is in place, and employers everywhere may be eligible for insurance discounts.

Our Drug Free Workplace Program training kit provides: a manual with a comprehensive written policy, an employee assistance program, a controlled drug testing procedure, a 13-lesson employee program, a 6- lesson supervisor program, certificates of completion, all the necessary publications, forms and records. Please read further for a detailed account of the problems of substance abuse, how a prevention safety manual helps businesses and how Safety Services Company can provide you with your DFWP.

(more…)


Understanding Material Handling and Rigging Regulations

Complete Rigging Safety Solutions

Rigging safety is a critical part of shipyard and construction employment, used to lift heavy materials to heights with cranes and other devices. Riggers also act as signalman. Improper rigging of a load or a rigging failure can expose riggers and other workers nearby to a variety of potential hazards.

Annually about 50 riggers are killed when loads have slipped from the rigging, or when the rigging has failed. To protect workers against accident, OSHA has a series of strict rigging requirements. These requirements call for you to maintain rigging equipment, properly train employees and more.

By cutting down on accidents through an effective program, your company can not only improve its profitability, but remove the risk for a costly OSHA fine or lawsuit.

Hazards of Rigging in Crane Operation

Rigging involves the use of cranes and other large pieces of equipment to lift steel and other materials. OSHA heavily regulates this practice.. With at least 225,000 cranes operating in the U.S., accidents are bound to happen, but the majority of crane accidents resulting in fatalities and injuries are preventable, according to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). More than 50% of all mobile crane accidents are the result of mistakes made when the crane was being set up. All of these accidents are preventable by following the manufacturer’s recommendations for assembly and dismantling, by using the correct components, and by observing the necessary precautions.

Other hazards associated with cranes include fall hazards created by:

  • Uneven working surfaces.
  • Wet and slippery working surfaces.
  • Working surfaces not cleared of obstructions.
  • Improper use of portable ladder.
  • Unprotected sides, bulkhead openings, deck holes more than 5 ft.

Struck-by and Crushing Hazards created by:

  • Gear and equipment not properly inspected.
  • Defective gear and equipment.
  • Moving parts and equipment.
  • Improperly rigged loads.
  • Improper use of tag line allowing hoisting material to swing out of control.
  • Loads swung or suspended overhead.
  • Hazardous locations between a swinging load and fixed object.

Electrical Hazards created by:

  • Use of hoisting and hauling equipment near energized lines.
  • Tools and equipment not properly grounded.
  • Defective electrical tools.
  • Worn or frayed electric cables.

While the potential for injury is staggering, the financial impact they place on employers is overwhelming. An annual study conducted by the Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety in 2010, revealed that the direct cost to employers from injuries in 2008 was $53.42 billion. [1] Furthermore, the study concluded that accidents at the workplace were estimated to cost employers an additional $80 to $200 billion annually.

A second report by the U.S. Department of Labor cemented the finding of the insurance group’s report. This report stated the average workplace injury cost an employer $43,000. The same study estimated the cost from wage replacement due to injury to be roughly $50 billion a year. “An accident at the workplace can often be the difference between operating in the black and falling into the red,” said Safety Services CEO Devon Dickinson.

OSHA Requirements for Rigging

OSHA has established multiple regulations designed to prevent accidents during the use of rigging. These regulations require you to:

  • Inspect rigging equipment for material handling prior to use on each shift and as necessary during its use to ensure that it is safe. Remove defective rigging equipment from service.
  • Inspect the ground.
  • Never load rigging equipment in excess of its recommended safe working load.
  • Remove rigging equipment, when not in use, from the immediate work area so as not to present a hazard to employees.
  • Make and maintain a record of the most recent month in which each alloy steel chain sling was thoroughly inspected, and make such record available for examination.
  • Train on rigging materials
  • Train on proper usage
  • Provide and ensure proper use of proper PPE
  • Train on hazards
  • Establish and maintain effective signaling procedures

While the blow of a workplace injury cripples many companies, safety training programs are proven to drastically reduce the risk of injury and increase workplace productivity. Through independent studies, OSHA has confirmed employers who have in place a safety and health training program experience a 52 percent lower rate of “injury with days away” than employers without a program. [2]

A second study of private industry employers by OSHA found even more benefits to a safety training program. Here are a few highlights of those programs:

Company Benefits

  • Average sales rose 7.5 percent
  • Manufacturing defects and waste dropped from $2.7 million in 2001 to $435,000 in 2005
  • Improved decision-making
  • Emergency modification rate dropped by 45%

Safety and health also make big reductions in indirect costs, due to:

  • Increased productivity
  • Higher quality products
  • Increased morale
  • Better labor/management relations
  • Reduced turnover
  • Better use of human resources

Workplaces that establish safety and health management systems can reduce their injury and illness costs by 20 to 40 percent, according to OSHA. Studies not only show the impact safety training has in increasing productivity and preventing injury. It shows the value training has to prevent casualties. [4] A study of the California insurance industry determined that every dollar invested in safety training resulted in $3 or more dollars in savings,” Safety training is not a cost, it is an investment.

An Easier Compliance Solution

By requesting and reading this report, you are no doubt aware of the hazards associated with aerial and the long list of regulations your company must abide by. Meeting these regulations is a tedious process requiring you either to develop a training program yourself or to outsource with expensive safety consultants. There is a better solution.

Here at Safety Services we have developed a “Do-It-Yourself” training program that is both simple to administer and fulfills all your OSHA requirements. This innovative kit features an Interactive Training Program, Student’s Handbook, Instructor’s Handbook, OSHA Regulations, Student Tests, Training Logs, Fall Protection Checklist, Certificates, Wallet Cards and More.

What Does It Cover

  • OSHA Requirements
  • Material Storage
  • Equipment
  • PPE
  • Inspections
  • Rigging
  • Loading
  • Lifting
  • Training Requirements
  • Accident Prevention
  • And much more

Our $449.99 kit is a simple three-step solution that brings all your employees into compliance.

  1. Classroom/online training
    • The first step of our program is an intuitive electronic training session. Through the program, employees navigate an electronic training program at a computer and then take an automatically graded test.
  2. Field training
    • The second part of training is in the field. During this portion of the session, your appointed trainer shows the trainee the infield applications of the materials they learned in the classroom session.
  3. Evaluation
    • The third and final step to the training session is evaluation. Through this step, the trainer evaluates the trainee and either signs off on certification or retouches on topics that need more work. All certification through the program meets or exceeds OSHA requirements.

Overview of Materials Handling & Rigging Kit

The rigging safety kit starts by explaining the reasons for training and what makes up an effective training program. The next subject is the proper ergonomic principles of personally lifting heavy loads. Following that is a discussion on the proper way to stage and transport heavy materials by hand, vehicle lifts, reach forklifts and then roll-out truck beds.

Hazards of heavy lifting are explained in detail like: awkward positions, high frequency and long duration lifting, environmental factors, loading and unloading vehicles. Each discussed hazard includes the proper procedures for eliminating it from your workplace. Furthermore, you will be informed of the safe way to move larger material mechanically, avoiding storage hazards and how to stack materials.

Becoming Certified to Operate a Crane

This Material Handling and Rigging Kit covers important information to work with crane operators on how to rig the loads to be lifted, but it will not fulfill the requirements necessary to be a certified crane operator.

Starting November 8, 2010, the operator qualification and certification requirements of Subpart CC – Cranes and Derricks in Construction (29 CFR 1926.1427) changed to improve the quality of anybody engaged in a construction activity, operating a crane.

According to OSHA, all crane operators must be licenced.

There are 4 ways an equipment operator can be qualified or certified and meet OSHA Requirements:

  1. A certificate from an accredited crane operator testing organization.
  2. Qualification from the employer through an audited employer program.
  3. Qualification by the US Military (only applies to employees of Department of Defense or Armed Forces and does not include private contractors)
  4. Licensing by a state or local government.

Certification includes two parts:

  1. A written examination that includes the safe operating procedures for the particular type of equipment the applicant will be operating and technical understanding of the subject matter criteria required in 1926.1427(j).
  2. A practical exam showing the applicant has the skills needed to safely operate the equipment, including, among other skills, the ability to properly use load chart information and recognize items required in the shift inspection.

Call (877) 201-8923 today to speak with one of our safety solutions experts.

Citations

This publication does not itself alter or determine compliance responsibilities. OSHA, directly, sets the standards. Moreover, because interpretations and enforcement policy may change over time, for additional guidance on OSHA compliance requirements, the reader should consult current and administrative interpretations and decisions by the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission and the Courts.

360° Forklift Training & Certification Solutions

Certification & Forklift Training OSHA

Forklifts, also known as Powered Industrial Trucks (PIT), are used in numerous work settings, primarily to move materials. Each year in the United States, nearly 100 workers are killed and another 20,000 are seriously injured in forklift-related incidents. Forklift overturns are the leading cause of these fatalities representing about 25% of all forklift-related deaths. In regard to forklift training OSHA requires employers to certify employees in the proper operation and maintenance of forklifts, and train those who may come into contact with lifts on hazards and best practices.

It is a common belief that certification is something that has to be completed through private contractors. However, OSHA regulations allow you to certify your own employees through the creation of an OSHA-complaint program. Independent studies have confirmed forklift training reduces operator errors by 70%.

Forks and Hazards

As a further illustration of the risk associated with forklift operation OSHA estimates that of the 1 million forklifts in the United States two-thirds are involved in an accident in their normal eight-year life span. These incidents are attributed to three causes according to OSHA:

  1. Insufficient or inadequate forklift training.
  2. Failure to follow safe forklift operating procedures.
  3. Lack of safety rule enforcement.

Common Causes of Forklift Fatalities

  • Forklift overturns (22%)
  • Worker on foot struck by forklift (20%)
  • Victim crushed by forklift (16%)
  • Fall from forklift (9%)

Death and Injury Can Cripple Your Company

Workplace deaths and injuries are heartbreaking to families and financially crippling to employers. The U.S. Department of Labor estimates these injuries and deaths cost employers $1 billion a week in worker’s compensation costs. And when lost productivity, increased insurance premiums and other costs are added in, the total economic impact of occupational accidents is more than $4 billion a week or $668 for every citizen in the United States.

Annual Studies

An annual study conducted by the Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety in 2010, revealed that the direct cost to employers from injuries in 2008 was $53.42 billion. Furthermore, accidents at the workplace were estimated to cost employers an additional $80 to $200 billion annually. A second report by the U.S. Department of Labor cemented the finding of the insurance groups report. This report stated the average workplace injury cost an employer $43,000. The same study estimated the cost from wage replacement due to injury to be roughly $50 billion a year.

Profit and Loss

An accident at the workplace can often be the difference between operating in the black and falling into the red. In addition to the financial ramifications due to health related issues, OSHA can fine employers for not having a policy in place. These fines start at $7,000.

OSHA Requirements Intervention

To protect employers and employees from the danger of operating forklifts OSHA crafted regulation 29 CFR 1910.178, which outlays a strict series of training, operating and maintenance requirements for all companies utilizing PITs.

This next chapter is a survey of some of the requirements in forklift operation that a novice may not know.

Forklift Operation

Your employees need training on the basics of forklift operation. These topics must include:

  • The proper distance forks are to be raised when transporting a load and the operating of the forks while the lift is moving in a forward or reverse direction. [29 CFR 1910.178 (n)(7)(iii)].
  • The safe speeds at which the forklift is to operate to facilitate proper stopping. [29 CFR 1910.178 (n)(8)].
  • The operator is required to look forward and keep a clear view of the travel path [29 CFR 1910.178(n)(6)].
  • The riding on a lift by a person other than the primary operator. [29 CFR 1910.178 (m)(3)].
  • The driving of forklifts into fixed objects that other objects may be resting on. These objects include benches, tables and more.[29 1910.178 (m)(1)]

Impact of Training

Training is an important part of eliminating job place injuries. Studies of forklift specific training show a 70% reduction in operator errors. [2]  Through independent studies, OSHA has confirmed employers who have in place a safety and health training program experience a 52 percent lower rate of “injury with days away” than employers without a program. [7]

A second study of private industry employers by OSHA found even more benefits to a safety training program. Here are a few highlights of those programs:

Company Benefits

  • Average Sales rose 7.5 percent
  • Manufacturing defects and waste dropped from $2.7 million in 2001 to $435,000 in 2005
  • Improved decision-making
  • Emergency Modification Rate dropped by 45%

Safety Leads to Reductions in Indirect Costs:

  • Increased productivity
  • Higher quality products
  • Increased morale
  • Better labor/management relations
  • Reduced turnover
  • Better use of human resources

Value of Training

The value of training is further emphasized by a study of 41 workers hospitalized for hand injuries. Through the survey of these employees conducted by members of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) it was discovered more than half had no on-the-job training for the equipment that caused their injury.

Workplaces that establish safety and health management systems can reduce their injury and illness costs by 20 to 40 percent, according to OSHA. Studies not only show the impact safety training has in increasing productivity and preventing injury. It shows the value training has to prevent casualties. [7] A NIOSH study of 55 confined workplace fatalities found that only three of those losing their lives ever received training on the proper workplace safety procedures.

For Every Dollar Invested in Safety Training…

A study of the California insurance industry also revealed that every dollar invested in safety training resulted in $3 or more dollars in savings,” Safety training is not a cost, it is an investment.

A Simpler Forklift Safety Solution

By requesting and reading this report, you are no doubt aware of the hazards associated with forklifts and the long list of regulations your company must abide by. Meeting these regulations is a tedious process that requires you either to develop a training program yourself or to outsource with expensive safety consultants. There is a better solution.

Here at Safety Services Company, we have developed a “Do-It-Yourself” training program that is both simple to administer and fulfills all your OSHA forklift requirements.

Three Steps to Certification

Our $449.99 kit is a simple three-step solution that brings all your employees into compliance.

  1. Classroom/online training
    • The first step of our program is an intuitive electronic training session. Through the program, employees navigate an electronic training program at a computer and then take an automatically graded test. If computers are not available materials are printable for a traditional classroom or onsite training seminar.
  2. Field training
    • The second part of training is in the field. During this portion of the session, your appointed trainer shows the trainee the infield applications of the materials they learned in the classroom session.
  3. Evaluation
    • The third and final step to the training session is evaluation. Through this step, the trainer evaluates the trainee and either signs off on certification or retouches on topics that need more work.

Train-the-Trainer

All certification through the program meets or exceeds OSHA requirements. In addition to providing you with the knowledge to train your employees, our kit comes with our renowned “Train-the-Trainer” software, which transforms your employees into expert trainers. Our training kits cover:

  • OSHA requirements
  • Manuals
  • Safety decals and information
  • PPE
  • Inspections
  • Start-up
  • Operation
  • Hazards
  • Maneuvering
  • Maintenance
  • And much more…

Your forklift training kit will include:

  • Student Manual
  • Instructor’s manual
  • Inspection sheets
  • Training logs
  • Safety certificates
  • Wallet cards
  • Safety tests
  • CD-ROM disk
  • Training presentation
  • Software to print extra
  • Wallet cards, certificates
  • Inspection sheets, tests, etc.

Continuous Commitment

As a valued Safety Services customer, we pledge to continually monitor the ever-changing safety requirements in your specific field, and will contact your company when a change may occur.

Call (877) 201-8923 today to speak with one of our safety solutions experts.

Citations

Because interpretations and enforcement policy may change over time, for additional guidance on OSHA compliance requirements, the reader should consult current and administrative interpretations and decisions by the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission and the Courts.

Back to Basics: Avoiding Fall Protection Pitfalls

When Working Over Dangerous Equipment and Machinery Fall Protection Must Be Provided.

Excavation and trenching are among the most hazardous construction operations with cave-ins posing the greatest risk. In addition to the possible loss of life and injury, falls are costly to employers. Liberty Mutual recently estimated that on an annual basis fall related incidents cost employers in the U.S. nearly $100 billion. Remember, when working over dangerous equipment and machinery fall protection must be provided

Basic OSHA Fall Protection Regulations

To protect against the possibility of injury and death, fall protection must be provided at 4 feet in general industry, 5 feet in maritime and 6 feet in construction. However, regardless of the fall distance, fall protection must be provided when working over dangerous equipment and machinery.

OSHA has a long list of regulations and requirements designed to protect employees and employers from the risks associated with falls.  These regulations include hazard assessments, hazard elimination, fall protection systems, training and more.

Meeting these training standards is proven to significantly reduce the possibility of fall incidents at the workplace.

Falls Cripple Employees & Companies

In the U.S. construction industry, falls are the leading cause of worker fatalities. Each year between 150 and 200 workers are killed and more than 100,000 are injured as a result of falls.

It is not a phenomenon contained to the construction industry. Based on data from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health(NIOSH) National Traumatic Occupational Fatalities (NTOF) Surveillance System, falls from elevations were the fourth leading cause of workplace death from 1980 through 1994 with falls from elevations accounting for 10% of all occupational fatalities during this period, an average of 540 deaths per year. [3]

In fact, the 2010 Liberty Mutual Workplace Safety Index indicates falls were the leading cause of all workplace injuries in 2008. [2]  Across all industries the main agents for major injuries are ladders. [1]  The problem is not improving.

Liberty Mutual’s Index

Liberty Mutual’s index indicates that between 1998 and 2008 all fall related incidents experienced a 50.6 percent growth rate. More troubling is in this time frame most other causes of workplace injuries experienced a substantial reduction in their rate of growth. [2]

In terms of cost of fall injuries Liberty Mutual’s study concludes falls account for 25.6 percent of direct costs associated with injuries, or more than $13.67 billion annually. [2] Additionally, the National Safety Council (NSC) estimates workers’ compensation and medical costs associated with employee fall accidents are approximately $70 billion per year.

Loss of productivity is another side effect of falls. On average, an injured worker spends more days away from work (median: 8 days) than those who are injured as a result of other causes (median: 6 days). Most troubling, nearly 30 percent of falls result in more than 21 workdays lost.

A further cost is those of claims. Workplaces who have no fall protection policy in place open themselves to a potential lawsuit from an employee involved in a fall incident. For example the QBE insurance group estimates the financial the costs associated with a young person who is rendered quadriplegic from a fall can run millions of dollars. As can be expected the severity of falls from height is more significant than other workplace accidents. The group further estimates the average employer loss resulting from a fall claim to be $24,000. [1]

Regulations to Protect Your Company and Employees

OSHA recognizes accidents involving falls are complex and generally involve several factors. To deal with the myriad of issues responsible for falls, the government organization has created a system of multilayered regulations to cover both the human and equipment-related issues in protecting workers from fall hazards. These regulations deal with proper use and installation of safety systems, supervision, safe work procedures, maintenance and more.

Here is a look at those regulations;

  • 1910.23 Guarding floor and wall openings and holes.
    • This standard and its subparts cover workplace walking and working surfaces. The standard states that you are to provide guardrail protection around holes and other floor openings. The floor openings may include ladder ways, open chutes and hatches.
  • 1926.500 Fall Protection Requirements in Construction Workplace
    • These regulations and subparts define requirements and criteria for fall protection in construction workplaces. The section identifies those workplaces, conditions, operations, and circumstances for which fall protection shall be provided and the type of equipment that must be provided.
  • 1926.501 Duty to Provide Fall Protection
    • This regulation sets forth requirements for employers to provide fall protection systems. Individual employers are required to determine if the walking/working surfaces on which its employees are to work have the strength and structural integrity to support employees safely.
  • 1926.502 Fall Protection Systems Criteria and Practices
    • This regulation and its subparts requires employers to provide for all employees any and all fall protection systems. The regulation also requires the employer installs all fall protection systems before any employee begins the work that necessitates the fall protection.

Subparts

Specific subparts of the regulation cover the following types of fall equipment and fall protection tools:

  • Permanent guard rail and portable guardrail systems
  • Safety netting and safety net systems
  • Personal fall arrest systems

These regulations also define and give performance criteria for Personal Protective Equipment as part of a fall arrest system.

  • 1926.503 Fall Protection Training Program

This regulation details the requirements you must provide in a training program for employees exposed to fall hazards. The training program must teach employees to recognize the hazards of falling and shall train each employee in the procedures to be followed in order to minimize these hazards. The employer is required train each employee in the following areas:

  • Fall hazards in the work area.
  • Procedures for erecting, maintaining, disassembling, and inspecting the fall protection systems to be used.
  • Use and operation of guardrail systems, personal fall arrest systems, safety net systems, warning line systems, safety monitoring systems, controlled access zones, and any other fall protection that employee will use.

Prevent Injuries and Increase Productivity

While the blow of a workplace injury is crippling to many companies, safety training programs are proven to drastically reduce the risk of injury and increase workplace productivity. Through independent studies, OSHA has confirmed employers who have in place a safety and health training program experience a 52 percent lower rate of “injury with days away” than employers without a program. [4] A second study of private industry employers by OSHA found even more benefits to a safety training program.

Here are a few highlights of those programs:

Company Benefits

  • Average Sales rose 7.5 percent
  • Manufacturing defects and waste dropped from $2.7 million in 2001 to $435,000 in 2005
  • Improved decision-making
  • EMR dropped by 45%

Safety Leads to Big Reductions in Indirect Costs

  • Increased productivity
  • Higher quality products
  • Increased morale
  • Better labor/management relations
  • Reduced turnover
  • Better use of human resources

The value of training is further emphasized by a study of 41 workers hospitalized for hand injuries. Through the survey of these employees conducted by members of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) it was discovered more than half had no on the job training for the equipment that caused their injury.

Workplaces that establish safety and health management systems can reduce their injury and illness costs by 20 to 40 percent, according to OSHA. Studies not only show the impact safety training has in increasing productivity and preventing injury. It shows the value training has to prevent casualties. [4] A NIOSH study of 55 confined workplace fatalities found that only three of those losing their lives ever received training on the proper workplace safety procedures. A study of the California insurance industry also revealed that every dollar invested in safety training resulted in $3 or more dollars in savings,” Safety training is not a cost, it is an investment.

Fall Protection Systems

Listed below are the types of fall safety equipment and their usage

  • Class 1 – Body belts (single or double D-ring) are designed to restrain a person in a hazardous work position and to reduce the possibility of falls. They should not be used when fall potential exists; positioning only.
  • 2nd Class – Chest harnesses are used when there are only limited fall hazards (no vertical free fall hazard), or for retrieving persons such as removal of persons from a tank or a bin.
  • Class 3 – Full body harnesses are designed to arrest the most severe free falls.
  • 4th Class – Suspension belts are independent work supports used to suspend a worker, such as boatswain’s chairs or raising or lowering harnesses.
  • Rope Lanyard – Offers some elastic properties for all arrest; used for restraint purpose.
  • Web Lanyard – Ideal for restraint where fall hazards are less than 2 feet.
  • Cable Positioning Lanyards – Designed for corrosive or excess heat environments and must be used in conjunction with shock absorbing devices.
  • Shock Absorbers – When used, the fall arresting force will be greatly reduced if a fall occurs.
  • Rope Grabs – A deceleration device which travels on a lifeline, used to safely ascend or descend ladders or sloped surfaces and automatically, by friction, engages the lifeline and locks so as to arrest the fall of an employee.
  • Retractable Lifeline – Gives fall protection and mobility to the user when working at height or in areas where there is a danger of falling.
  • Safety Nets – Can be used to lessen the fall exposure where temporary floors and scaffolds are not used and the fall distance exceeds 25 feet.
  • Rail Systems – When climbing a ladder, rail systems can be used on any fixed ladder as well as curved surfaces as a reliable method of fall prevention.

Categories of Fall Protection Equipment

Fall Arrest

A fall arrest system is required if any risk exists that a worker may fall from an elevated position, as a general rule, the fall arrest system should be used anytime a working height of six feet or more is reached.

Working height is the distance from the walking/working surface to a grade or lower level. A fall arrest system will only come into service should a fall occur. A full-body harness with a shock-absorbing lanyard or a retractable lifeline is the only product recommended. A full-body harness distributes the forces throughout the body, and the shock-absorbing lanyard decreases the total fall arresting forces.

Positioning

This system holds the worker in place while keeping his/her hands free to work. Whenever the worker leans back, the system is activated. However, the personal positioning system is not specifically designed for fall arrest purposes.

Suspension

This equipment lowers and supports the worker while allowing a hands-free work environment, and is widely used in window washing and painting industries. This suspension system components are not designed to arrest a free fall, a backup fall arrest system should be used in conjunction with the suspension system.

Retrieval

Pre-plan for retrieval in the event of a fall when developing a proactive fall management program.

There is a Better Solution

As North America’s largest supplier of safety training materials we are able to offer safety compliance solutions and products that will not break the bank.  Our “Do-It-Yourself” Fall Protection Kit. This innovative kit features an Interactive Training Program, Student’s Handbook, Instructor’s Handbook, OSHA Regulations, Student Tests, Training Logs, Fall Protection Checklist, Certificates, Wallet Cards and More.

Topics addressed in the kit include:

  • OSHA requirements
  • Accident Prevention
  • Fall hazard analysis
  • Definitions
  • Training requirements
  • Fall protection systems
  • Personal fall arrest systems
  • Employee responsibilities
  • Warning lines

Continuing Commitment

Your purchase from Safety Services not only makes you a valued customer, but also a member of the Safety Services Network. As a member of this exclusive group we pledge to continually monitor the ever changing safety requirements in your specific field and contact your company when a change may occur. We are also available to answer questions on your purchase, or any other available materials via e-mail or phone.

All certification through the program meets or exceeds OSHA requirements. In addition to meeting training requirements, the kit provides instruction on how to craft your scaffolding written policy. If you are not comfortable writing your own policy we can provide the service for an additional fee. Remember, when working over dangerous equipment and machinery fall protection must be provided.

Call (877) 201-8923 today to speak with one of our safety solutions experts.

Citations

This publication does not itself alter or determine compliance responsibilities, which are set forth in OSHA standards themselves and the Occupational Safety and Health Act. Moreover, because interpretations and enforcement policy may change over time, for additional guidance on OSHA compliance requirements, the reader should consult current and administrative interpretations and decisions by the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission and the Courts.


Eliminating Earthmoving Equipment Hazards

Complete OSHA Earth Moving Equipment Training Solutions

Earthmoving equipment or heavy equipment refers to a set of large construction vehicles used to move soil, rock and other heavy objects. Due to the large nature of this equipment, when accidents occur they are often tragic. While OSHA does not have a specific regulation for each piece of equipment, the federal organization requires you to train your employees on the hazards of equipment, proper usage and more. This OSHA earthmoving equipment safety training must be provided to both the workers using the equipment and anyone else who may come into contact with the equipment.

Training Reduces Accidents

While the consequence of a workplace injury would be crippling to many companies, safety-training programs are proven to drastically reduce the risk of injury and increase workplace productivity. Through independent studies, OSHA has confirmed employers who have in place a safety and health training program experience a 52 percent lower rate of “injury with days away” than employers without a program. [2] A second study of private industry employers by OSHA found even more benefits to a safety-training program.

A second study of private industry employers by OSHA found even more benefits to a safety-training program.

Company Benefits

  • Average sales rose 7.5 percent
  • Manufacturing defects and waste dropped from $2.7 million to $435,000 four years later
  • Improved decision-making
  • Emergency Modification Rate dropped by 45%

Safety and Health Increases ROI

  • Increased productivity
  • Higher quality products
  • Increased morale
  • Better labor/management relations
  • Reduced turnover
  • Better use of human resources

The value of training is further emphasized by a study of 41 workers hospitalized for hand injuries. Through the survey of these employees conducted by members of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) it was discovered more than half had no on the job training for the equipment that caused their injury.

Workplaces that establish safety and health management systems can reduce their injury and illness costs by 20 to 40 percent, according to OSHA. Studies not only show the impact safety training has in increasing productivity and preventing injury. It shows the value training has to prevent casualties. [7]

A NIOSH study of 55 confined workplace fatalities found that only three of those losing their lives ever received training on the proper workplace safety procedures. A study of the California insurance industry also revealed that every dollar invested in safety training resulted in $3 or more dollars in savings,” Safety training is not a cost, it is an investment.

An Easier Compliance Solution

By requesting and reading this report you are no doubt aware of the hazards associated with heavy equipment and the long list of regulations your company must abide by. Meeting these regulations is a tedious process requiring you either to develop a training program yourself or to outsource with expensive safety consultants.

There is a better solution. Here at Safety Services we have developed a “Do-It-Yourself” training program that is both simple to administer and fulfills all your OSHA requirements. This innovative kit features an Interactive Training Program, Student’s Handbook, Instructor’s Handbook, OSHA Regulations, Student Tests, Training Logs, Fall Protection Checklist, Certificates, Wallet Cards and More.

Topics addressed:

  • OSHA requirements
  • Manuals
  • Safety decals and information
  • PPE
  • Inspections
  • Start-up
  • Operation
  • Hazards
  • Maneuvering
  • Maintenance
  • And much more

Our $449.99 kit is a simple three-step compliance solution

  1. Classroom/online training
    • The first step of our program is an intuitive electronic training session. Through the program, employees navigate an electronic training program at a computer and then take an automatically graded test.
  2. Field training
    • The second part of training is in the field. During this portion of the session, your appointed trainer shows the trainee the infield applications of the materials they learned in the classroom session.
  3. Evaluation
    • The third and final step to the training session is evaluation. Through this step, the trainer evaluates the trainee and either signs off on certification or retouches on topics that need more work. All certification through the program meets or exceeds OSHA requirements.

In addition to meeting OSHA safety training requirements, the kit provides instruction on how to craft your Excavations written policy. If you are not comfortable writing your own policy we can provide the service for an additional fee.

Call (877) 201-8923 today to speak with one of our safety solutions experts.

Citations

  1. [1] http://www.cpwr.com/hazpdfs/hazaeriallifts.pdf
  2. [2] http://www.labor.state.ny.us/workerprotection/safetyhealth/PDFs/WSLP/Cost%20Benefit%20Safety.pdf
  3. [3] http://www.osha.gov/Publications/smallbusiness/small-business.pdf
  4. [4] http://www.osha.gov/Publications/safety-health-addvalue.html

Shoring up Education on Excavation Hazards Safety

Summary

Excavation and trenching are among the most hazardous construction operations with cave-ins posing the greatest risk.

Other excavation related hazards include falls, falling loads, hazardous atmospheres, and incidents involving mobile equipment. Trench collapses cause dozens of fatalities and hundreds of injuries each year.

To protect workers from the hazards of trenching and excavations OSHA instituted a series of requirements in 1971 and has updated the standard multiple times since.

Among the requirements are that employers use the proper protective systems, have in place a competent person and train employees on the dangers of excavations.

Here at Safety Services we offer a simple cost effective training solution to help your company meet OSHA’s requirements. (more…)


Hand and Power Tool Safety Training Solutions

Hand Tool Injury Statistics

Tools are such a common part of our lives that it is difficult to remember they pose hazards. All tools are manufactured with safety in mind but, tragically, a serious accident often occurs before steps are taken to search out and avoid or eliminate tool-related hazards. Today, we are going to cover hand tool injury statistics and training benefits.

If you do not have this policy in place you could face fines from OSHA, suffer lost productivity and endure a possible lawsuit.

To help protect your business we have developed a tool safety training program that addresses the tools in your industry.

This thorough training package is like no other in the industry.

Read on for more information on the hazards of tools, cost of injury, effectiveness of training and your requirements.

Hazards of Hand and Power Tools

According to the Consumer Products Safety Commission, more than 400,000 people suffer power tool injuries each year. Of those injured, more than 200 die.

It is without a doubt that the improper use of power tools or not using the proper personal protection equipment with these tools can cause injury or death.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics:

  • One out of every 10 construction industry employees is injured annually.
  • 1,000 construction workers are killed every year on-site.
  • A typical construction injury results in more than 30 days of missed work.
  • Construction workers, under the age of 35, have a higher incidence of injury.
  • Injuries to the back and ribs are the most common.

Tool Hazards

Hand tools include anything from axes to wrenches. The greatest hazards posed by hand tools result from misuse and improper maintenance.

Some examples include the following:

  • If a chisel is used as a screwdriver, the tip of the chisel may break and fly off, hitting the user or other employees.
  • If a wooden handle on a tool, such as a hammer or an axe, is loose, splintered, or cracked, the head of the tool may fly off and strike the user or other employees.
  • Finally, if the jaws of a wrench are sprung, the wrench might slip.

Electric Tools

Electrical shocks, which can lead to injuries such as heart failure and burns, are among the major hazards associated with electric powered tools. Under certain conditions, even a small amount of electric current can result in fibrillation of the heart and death. An electric shock also can cause the user to fall off a ladder or other elevated work surface and be injured due to the fall.

Pneumatic tools are powered by compressed air and include chippers, drills, hammers, and sanders.

There are several dangers associated with the use of pneumatic tools. First and foremost is the danger of getting hit by one of the tool’s attachments or by some kind of fastener the worker is using with the tool.

Fuel-Powered Tools

The most serious hazard associated with the use of fuel-powered tools comes from fuel vapors that can burn or explode and also give off dangerous exhaust fumes.

Hazards of these tools include flying materials, the extreme pressure the tools give off and more.

Hydraulic Power tools use a liquid to drive their motion. These tools present similar dangers as electric powered tools.

While physical harm is an unfortunate circumstance of unsafe tool behavior, it is not the only problem.

Research Studies

An annual study conducted by the Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety in 2010, revealed that the direct cost to employers from injuries in 2008 was $53.42 billion. [1]

Furthermore, a second report by the U.S. Department of Labor cemented the finding of the insurance groups report. This report stated the average workplace injury cost an employer $43,000. The same study estimated the cost from wage replacement due to injury to be roughly $50 billion a year.

“An accident at the workplace can often be the difference between operating in the black and falling into the red,” said Safety Services CEO Devon Dickenson.

OSHA Safety Requirements

Although OSHA does not have specific regulations for each hand and power tool, the group has stated through regulation, 29 CFR 1926.21(b)(2) you must train all employees on the hazards of the workplace.

In addition to maintenance and training you must ensure employees have the appropriate personal protective equipment, e.g., safety goggles, gloves, etc., and are correctly using that equipment.

While OSHA does not have a specific regulation for power tools, the organization does require you have in place the assured equipment grounding conductor program to protect your employees from electrical shock when using power tools.

This program should outline your specific procedures for the required equipment inspections, tests, and test schedule.

The Benefits of Safety Training

Through independent studies OSHA has confirmed employers who have in place a safety and health training program experience a 52 percent lower rate of “injury with days away” than employers without a program. [2]
A second study of private industry employers by OSHA found even more benefits to a safety training program.

Company Benefits

  • Average Sales rose 7.5 percent
  • Manufacturing defects and waste dropped from $2.7 million in 2001 to $435,000 in 2005
  • Improved decision-making
  • EMR dropped by 45%

Cost Reduction

Workplaces that establish safety and health management systems can reduce their injury and illness costs by 20 to 40 percent, according to OSHA.

Studies not only show the impact safety training has in increasing productivity and preventing injury. It shows the value training has to prevent casualties. [4]

A NIOSH study of 55 confined workplace fatalities found that only three of those losing their lives ever received training on the proper workplace safety procedures.

A study of the California insurance industry also revealed that every dollar invested in safety training resulted in $3 or more dollars in savings,”

There is a Better Solution

Meeting these regulations is a tedious process requiring you to either develop a training program yourself or to outsource with expensive safety consultants.

This innovative kit features an Interactive Training Program, Student’s Handbook, Instructor’s Handbook, OSHA Regulations, Student Tests, Training Logs, Fall Protection Checklist, Certificates, Wallet Cards and More.

Material covered Applicable OSHA standards

  • OSHA requirements
  • Accident Prevention
  • General requirements
  • Hand tools
  • Power tools
  • Abrasive wheels
  • Jacks
  • Training Requirements
  • Inspections
  • And much more

Our Three-Step Solution

Our $449.99 kit is a simple three-step solution that brings all your employees into compliance.

1. Classroom/online training
The first step of our program is an intuitive electronic training session. Through the program employees navigate an electronic training program at a computer and then take an automatically graded test. If computers are not available materials are printable for a traditional classroom or onsite training seminar.

2. Field training
The second part of training is in the field. During this portion of the session your appointed trainer shows the trainee the infield applications of the materials they learned in the classroom session.

3. Evaluation
The third and final step to the training session is evaluation. Through this step the trainer evaluates the trainee and either signs off on certification or retouches on topics that need more work.

All certification through the program meets or exceeds OSHA requirements.

In addition to meeting training requirements, the kit provides instruction on how to craft your scaffolding written policy.

If you are not comfortable writing your own policy we can provide the service for an additional fee.

We have complete OSHA compliant safety solutions for all your needs. Call (877) 201-8923 today to speak with one of our highly skilled safety experts about hand tool injury statistics and training kit options.

Citations


Scaffolding Safety in the Workplace

Summary

Between 2005 and 2010, OSHA issued more citations for violations of scaffolding than any other regulation. These violations however, are not the only cost associated with scaffolding. Each year, there are more than 4,500 injuries and 60 deaths stemming from scaffold-related incidents. An annual study conducted by the Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety in 2010, revealed workplace injuries cost employers more than $200 billion annually in total cost. The average injury cost more than $45,000.

In order to reduce the potential for scaffolding related accident OSHA requires all employers to certify their employees on the proper operation, maintenance, hazard training and more. These training policies are proven to reduce the likelihood of injury and save employers billions.

Read on for the full report on Scaffolding. (more…)


Lockout Tagout Hazards, Safety and Compliance

Summary

“Lockout/Tagout (LOTO)” refers to specific practices and procedures that safeguard employees from the unexpected energization, starting, of machinery, or the release of hazardous energy during maintenance.

The approximately 3 million workers who service equipment face the greatest risk of injury if lockout/tagout is not properly implemented.
Compliance with the lockout/tagout standard (29 CFR 1910.147) prevents an estimated 120 fatalities and 50,000 injuries each year. Workers injured on the job from exposure to hazardous energy lose an average of 24 workdays for recuperation.

In a study conducted by the United Auto Workers (UAW), 20% of the fatalities (83 of 414) that occurred among their members between 1973 and 1995 were attributed to inadequate hazardous energy control procedures specifically, lockout/tagout procedures. (more…)