Category: Safety School

Prepare for an OSHA Inspection

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Planning for an OSHA inspection with the proper safety meeting topics is good business. Take these 5 steps to prepare for a surprise worksite inspection and you’ll also have a solid foundation of safe work practices.

1. Take part in a Voluntary Protection Program. 

When you apply to have OSHA’s safety and health professionals evaluate the worksite, anything they find that needs to be fixed won’t result in a compliance citation as long as it is put right.

2. Make sure you and every other employer understands their responsibilities when it comes to the hazards at each worksite. 

Known as the “three Cs”, OSHA can cite employers if they: create the hazard, have control of the worksite, or are responsible to correct the hazard. This means different employers can be cited for the same hazard based on their responsibility for it.

3. Establish your rights.

Ask why the OSHA inspector is at your worksite because they need a legitimate reason. This probable cause can be: reported cases, complaints, targeted inspections or expressed points of emphasis, planned inspections, and even a compliance officer seeing a violation from the street.

Ask for a copy of the complaint/reason before they begin the inspection.

You have the right to restrict an inspection to the scope of the reason they are there. This could be a fatality, reported incident, or complaint. But be aware that anything the inspector sees during that inspection is fair game.

4. Know that OSHA can ask any employees questions in a private interview.

So the employer should make sure every employee can explain they know how to be safe at the worksite.

This also means they don’t have to answer any questions. If it’s the end of a long work day, and they have arranged a carpool, or if they are just shy they don’t have to answer any questions. Just don’t tell the workers you don’t want them to answer any questions, it’s their right to decide if they want to or not.

5. Managers will receive extra scrutiny, so train them up.

Whoever is responsible for the safety of others must know how to ensure it, including being aware of the hazards and the safe ways to mitigate them. The threshold for what OSHA considers a manager is low and includes: working lead, acting foreman, and competent person.

Other Safety School articles that examine the more academic concepts of occupational safety:

  • OSHA Inspections
  • Contact Release Training for NFPA 70E 2015
  • Scaffolding Code of Safe Practices
  • Emergency Response Plans for Permit Required Confined Spaces
  • Spotlighting the Importance of Checklists
  • Details of a Fully Developed Emergency Action Plan
  • The Six Guiding Principles of an Industrial Hygienist
  • Exactly How Does A Safety Manual Protect Your Company in an Inspection?
  • Who Is Covered (Or Not) By OSHA

Contact Release Training is New to NFPA 70E 2015

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The 2015 NFPA 70E standard for workplace electrical safety is now making the rounds, and depending on when the authority having jurisdiction (AHJ) you report to, may be adopted at any time in the next three years.

The foreword of the new standard lists 20 major changes. One change introduces the concept of “contact release” in the emergency response training. Employees exposed to shock hazards must be trained, every year, how to safely break a connection an electrocution victim may have with exposed parts. A person may freeze onto the conductor when the electricity coursing through the body causes muscles to contract, and if the current is strong anyone else who directly touches that person may be electrocuted as well.

Contact Release Training

Everybody needs to know to quickly turn off the power and safely rescue the victim without direct contact. Touching an electrocuted person may cause the second person to be shocked.

The first option is to turn off the power source at the disconnect switch, circuit breaker, power cord. Call for 911 and then have trained employees provide first aid, CPR, or AED assistance. Because sometimes the power source may be unknown or the disconnect switch can’t be located, every employee should know where they are in the case of an emergency.

The second option is forcibly removing the victim in a safe way if the power can’t be disconnected quickly enough to save the victim from breathing or heartbeat paralysis, and flesh and internal organ damage. This may mean dislodging, hitting or prying the victim with a nonconductive material while remaining in a safe location.

First examine the scene looking for other hazards especially stored energy, fire and hot surfaces.

Ideally your hands and feed should be dry, you are wearing protective equipment and be standing on a clean dry non-conductive surface like a rubber blanket or other insulating material.

Then knock, pry, or drag the victim from the conductor with nonconductive material which can be a dry wooden board, nonmetallic conduit, insulated tools, hot sticks, shotgun sticks or some nonconductive rope or an insulated extension cord. Loop the cord around their body or the grasping arm and pull strong enough to break their grip.

First Aid

The victim needs to be cared for until qualified emergency response personnel arrive. Check for breathing and pulse and if necessary administer CPR or use an AED up to your level of training. Once CPR has been started, continue until emergency personnel arrive.

Stay with the victim until help arrives and conduct additional first aid, according to training. If conscious, keep the victim still, warm and comfortable, they could suffer from insufficient blood circulation and go into physiological shock. They could also suffer heartbeat irregularities or a heart attack up to several hours later even if the shock isn’t enough to immediately disrupt the heartbeat.

Other Safety School articles that examine the more academic concepts of occupational safety:

  • OSHA Inspections
  • Contact Release Training for NFPA 70E 2015
  • Scaffolding Code of Safe Practices
  • Emergency Response Plans for Permit Required Confined Spaces
  • Spotlighting the Importance of Checklists
  • Details of a Fully Developed Emergency Action Plan
  • The Six Guiding Principles of an Industrial Hygienist
  • Exactly How Does A Safety Manual Protect Your Company in an Inspection?
  • Who Is Covered (Or Not) By OSHA

 

Download Scaffolding Code of Safe Practices Now

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Two scaffold safety organizations have developed a concise scaffolding code of safe practices that would beneficial for employers to post at worksites, follow and instill in all applicable workers.

With enough content to fill a small poster, the code covers general guidelines as well as erection, use, and dismantling. Download it here now, and put it to use.

The rules don’t go into all systems so any manufacturer guidelines also need to be followed. Instead this is a way to reinforce basic rules that should be common sense, but can easily be broken without proper education and constant reminders.

In the general guidelines is a step to survey and correct job site hazards looking for: untamped earth fills, ditches, debris, high tension wires, and unguarded openings. In the erection section is a reminder that free standing scaffold towers need to be restrained from tipping if they vertically exceed four times the base, with a 3 to 1 ratio for other agencies such as CAL/OSHA. Dismantling guidelines remind workers to be mindful that the scaffolding isn’t made unsafe in the process, visually check planks, not accumulate excess equipment on each level, or remove ties until the level above is dismantled…

This PDF can also be found under the “Safety Practices & Rules” tab of the Scaffolding, Shoring, & Forming Institute Inc. (SSFI) website. The SSFI has been around since 1960 and helps develop technical material, testing procedures and guidelines, often working with ANSI to test and rate equipment among other safety elements.

The other organization that developed this code is the Scaffold & Access Industry Association (SAIA) which promotes scaffold and access information working with state, federal and other agencies.

Other Safety School articles that examine the more academic concepts of occupational safety:

  • OSHA Inspections
  • Contact Release Training for NFPA 70E 2015
  • Scaffolding Code of Safe Practices
  • Emergency Response Plans for Permit Required Confined Spaces
  • Spotlighting the Importance of Checklists
  • Details of a Fully Developed Emergency Action Plan
  • The Six Guiding Principles of an Industrial Hygienist
  • Exactly How Does A Safety Manual Protect Your Company in an Inspection?
  • Who Is Covered (Or Not) By OSHA

Safety School: Spotlighting the Importance of Checklists

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Do you consider workplace checklists an important part of ensuring all necessary safe work procedures are consistently followed? Or do you consider a checklist a slow, tedious, and largely unnecessary procedure for work you already know how to do?

Here are two interesting accounts where checklists have been used to great effect. One is a matter of history that changed an industry, and the other occurred much more recently, demonstrating that there can be human resistance to following demonstrably better procedures.

Boeing B-17 and the First Checklist

On a B-17 test flight, in 1935, the aircraft stalled on takeoff because the elevator lock was accidentally left on, and pitch control didn’t work. Three men were injured, and two later died.

Because this new airplane was much more complicated to fly, it was determined that even experienced pilots would need a checklist. Instead of relying on memory every time, a checklist would ensure that all necessary steps were completed to keep the airplane safely in the air. Because of this simple, new process, Boeing was able to get the government to mass produce the B-17, and it went on to be a very successful asset for the United States in World War II.

Believe it or not, Boeing’s checklist is considered the first. Certainly, checklists are a very common practice in aviation today, where a focus on safety requires numerous variables to be checked before every flight. There are more than 25,000 daily commercial flights in the U.S. each day.

Hospital Checklist Slashes Infection Rates

In 2003, Dr. Peter J. Pronovost established a simple, five-step checklist to be followed every time a common catheter (central venous catheter) was inserted at 108 intensive-care units in Michigan. Over 18 months, catheter-related infection rates dropped from 4% to 0, saving 1,500 lives and nearly $200 million.

As you can see, the checklist is as simple as it gets:

  1. Wash hands with soap.
  2. Clean patient’s skin with chlorhexidine antiseptic.
  3. Put sterile drapes over the entire patient.
  4. Wear a sterile mask, hat, gown and gloves.
  5. Put a sterile dressing over the catheter site.

According to Dr. Pronovost, he wanted to change behavior, which he says is the biggest opportunity to improve health care. Still hospitals lag in implementing similar checklists. However in the news, the CDC procedures where health care workers who may come into contact with Ebola patients will have another person guide them through the step by step process of putting on and removing PPE amounts to a checklist.

Some reasons people resist using checklists include:

  • Experts such as doctors don’t want to be monitored by others
  • Experts want to have the freedom to act as they see fit
  • Standardized tasks are associated with bureaucracy, and more paperwork
  • There is a focus on new medical procedures rather than ensuring current ones are enforced

Checklists in the Workplace

So, looking at these two examples, can you see where workplace safety can benefit from following a checklist? Anywhere a series of steps has to be followed correctly every time, a checklist can be implemented to make sure everything has been covered and nothing is missed.

Here are a few places where creating a checklist may be helpful:

  • Making sure a first-aid kit is fully stocked with necessary materials
  • Daily and monthly inspections of vehicles such as: forklifts, cranes, and ladders
  • Annual workplace inspections
  • PPE maintenance and repair schedules
  • Required monthly and quarterly fire-extinguisher inspections
  • Equipment inspection and repair schedules
  • Start-up and shutdown procedures
  • Established lockout/tagout procedures

Other Safety School articles that examine the more academic concepts of occupational safety:

  • OSHA Inspections
  • Contact Release Training for NFPA 70E 2015
  • Scaffolding Code of Safe Practices
  • Emergency Response Plans for Permit Required Confined Spaces
  • Spotlighting the Importance of Checklists
  • Details of a Fully Developed Emergency Action Plan
  • The Six Guiding Principles of an Industrial Hygienist
  • Exactly How Does A Safety Manual Protect Your Company in an Inspection?
  • Who Is Covered (Or Not) By OSHA

Safety School: Details of a Fully Developed Emergency Action Plan

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Just like a Job Hazard Assessment (JHA) is a way to develop every day employee safe work practices, an Emergency Action Plan (EAP) is planning for possible workplace emergencies. And like a JHA, the EAP has a series of cornerstones – development, authority, training, and maintenance – to build upon and is specific to the workplace while having some recognizable commonalities (e.g. evacuation plan, shelter in place, and fire prevention).

Don’t assume that all workers will make the safe choice in the face of an emergency.

A trash fire may be something an employee may try to put out on his own but without the training to know when its past the incipient stage where it can easily be put out they can put themselves and others in danger by delaying warning everyone else.

EAP Cornerstones

That’s why it’s important to take the time to develop a plan that writes out what employees should do in each possible emergency. Use the workers experience to get a first-hand opinion of what the hazards and worst case scenarios are and possible responses.

Part of every EAP is identifying everybody’s responsibility including the person whose job it is to execute an EAP and evacuation procedures. The coordinator’s authority includes deciding there is an emergency, activating and overseeing emergencies procedures and contacting other emergency services such as the police or fire department.

Ensuring employees are trained in all elements of the EAP that affect them is another important component. They may need to know: their responsibilities, workplace hazards, possible notifications, response procedures such as evacuating or sheltering, location of available emergency equipment, and anything they need to shut down.

In order to be considered current any assessment or plan has to be maintained. Maintenance can mean: regular reviews; updates that incorporate new workplace conditions, equipment, or materials; information to outside emergency responders, evacuation drills, and ongoing training for new and current employees.

Common Elements

No matter how unique or safe the workplace is, it is going to include common elements such as: an evacuation procedure, shelter in place procedure, and a fire prevention plan. If an office has a workplace violence situation where a disgruntled current or former employee go to work threatening violence it may be necessary to evacuate the building getting the employees to a safer location while alerting the police. There are also situations where that same office, located in an industrial park where a rail line travels nearby, may want to have an interior room where all employees will have to report to and shelter-in-place because a car has derailed nearby and is leaking hazardous material.

Fire Prevention Plan

Every EAP needs a fire prevention plan that at least meets the OSHA requirements detailed in 29 CFR 1910.39. Think of a fire prevention plan as a compact EAP with its own four components: required lists, maintenance and control procedures, assigned responsibilities, and providing training. The required lists include identifying: major fire hazards, hazardous material handling and storage procedures, ignition sources and how to control them, and the needed fire protection equipment provided for the hazards. Control procedures include housekeeping to prevent the accumulation of flammable or combustible materials. Elements that need to be regularly maintained are the safeguards on heat producing equipment so that combustible materials don’t ignite. And just like the larger EAP, every employee needs to know their responsibilities and who has the authority to assign them. Fire prevention plan specific responsibilities include maintaining equipment to prevent ignition, and who controls the fuel sources. Fire prevention training must have the potential fire hazards and how the worker will protect themselves.

Additional Resources

There are ways to get even more specific guidance on creating an EAP than this survey. For example, OSHA provides instruction and checklists to help businesses get started, and OSHA state plans may provide additional state specific guidance and other consensus standard establishing organizations that even OSHA defers to on specific criteria like the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) can be referenced.

Other Safety School articles that examine the more academic concepts of occupational safety:

  • OSHA Inspections
  • Contact Release Training for NFPA 70E 2015
  • Scaffolding Code of Safe Practices
  • Emergency Response Plans for Permit Required Confined Spaces
  • Spotlighting the Importance of Checklists
  • Details of a Fully Developed Emergency Action Plan
  • The Six Guiding Principles of an Industrial Hygienist
  • Exactly How Does A Safety Manual Protect Your Company in an Inspection?
  • Who Is Covered (Or Not) By OSHA

Safety School: Principles of Industrial Hygiene

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Principles of Industrial Hygiene

An Industrial Hygienist (IH) is a safety expert whose three main jobs are to anticipate hazards, evaluate the worksite for risks, and work out the best way to control them. Do you need an IH at your worksite, and if you do, are they operating ethically according to these guiding principles?

1. Follow Recognized Scientific Principles.

Industrial Hygienists shall practice their profession following recognized scientific principles with the realization that the lives, health, and well-being of people may depend upon their professional judgment and that they are obligated to protect the health and well-being of people.

  • Base conclusions on principles and practices that protect employees health and safety.
  • Do not deceive, falsify, misrepresent, or leave out facts.

2. Provide Guidance Based on Facts.

Industrial Hygienists shall counsel affected parties factually regarding potential health risks and precautions necessary to avoid adverse health effects.

  • Gather facts on potential hazards from trusted sources
  • Review the known information
  • Take the necessary steps to communicate the risks to affected parties: management, clients, employees, subcontractors, and other employers at the worksite

3. Keep Employee and Company Information Confidential

Industrial Hygienists shall keep confidential personal and business information obtained during the exercise of industrial hygiene activities, except when required by law or overriding health and safety considerations.

  • Relate necessary information to protect worker health and safety
  • Notify employer, client or appropriate authority when overruled judgment may endanger someone’s health and safety.
  • Obtain the information owner’s unambiguous authorization before releasing confidential personal or business information, except where a law or regulation requires its release.

4. Prevent Conflicts of Interest

Industrial Hygienists shall avoid circumstances where a compromise of professional judgment or conflict of interest may arise.

  • Immediately disclose potential conflicts of interest to affected parties
  • Don’t accept financial benefits from anyone who may want to influence a decision
  • Do not offer valuable considerations to get a job
  • Warn employers when you think a project will not successfully improve conditions
  • Do not accept work that hinders ability to finish current jobs
  • Always resolve conflicts in a way that protects the health of affected parties

5. Stay Within Your Expertise

Industrial Hygienists shall perform services only in the areas of their competence.

  • Only carry out jobs when properly qualified – through education, training, or experience – or have sufficient qualified assistance
  • Earn the necessary qualifications required by federal, state and local regulatory agencies before starting related work
  • Only attach or authorize the use of their seal, stamp or signature when the document is prepared by them or someone directly under their control

6. Uphold the Integrity of the Profession

Industrial Hygienists shall act responsibly to uphold the integrity of their profession.

  • Don’t do anything that will discredit the profession
  • Don’t lie to the public
  • Do not connect your name to a person or firm that you believe is being dishonest
  • Don’t lie about your education, experience or credentials
  • Don’t promote expertise or services in a way that misrepresents or leaves out a fact needed to keep the statement from being untrue
  • Do not allow employees or employers to misrepresent your professional background, expertise or services

We have complete OSHA compliant safety solutions for all your needs. Call (888) 247-6136 today to speak with one of our highly skilled safety experts.

Other Safety School articles that examine the more academic concepts of occupational safety:

  • OSHA Inspections
  • Contact Release Training for NFPA 70E 2015
  • Scaffolding Code of Safe Practices
  • Emergency Response Plans for Permit Required Confined Spaces
  • Spotlighting the Importance of Checklists
  • Details of a Fully Developed Emergency Action Plan
  • The Six Guiding Principles of an Industrial Hygienist
  • Exactly How Does A Safety Manual Protect Your Company in an Inspection?
  • Who Is Covered (Or Not) By OSHA

Safety School: Exactly How Does a Safety Manual Protect Your Company In an Inspection?

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Too often companies are told that they need to have a custom safety manual to protect them from OSHA violations, and while that’s true, understanding how that works is just as informative to a safely run company as having all the right words and regulations in a policy.

During an inspection, the inspector will ask for the written safety policy and all documentation of training, inspections and discipline. This documentation becomes important after the inspection, when a company can challenge or attempt to mitigate any possible penalties.

In legal terms you have “negating defenses” and “affirmative defenses” to argue any possible citations. The negating defense is simply arguing that that an allegation wasn’t a violation or it didn’t happen. More interestingly there is an affirmative defense, which admits the violation occurred but provides a justification. In a criminal case, “self-defense” is an affirmative defense.

So if an employee is spotted performing an unsafe action and a violation has been assessed, the inspector can look at the safety manual and training documents and ask:

  • Is there is a system in place?
  • Are employees trained in it?
  • Do you inspect the worksite and enforce the policy?

As an example, if the inspector cites an employer for a worker not wearing a hard hat, the company can challenge it with a policy stating that all employees must wear hard hats, evidence that employees are trained to know it’s a requirement, and evidence of inspections to enforce the policy with discipline when an employee doesn’t follow it.

Just having the policy isn’t enough; it needs to be backed up with ongoing application and training.

Safety Key Performance Indicators (KPI)

To go a step further, another way to demonstrate a commitment to safety in your policy is to track it.

Every company has its Key Performance Indicators (KPI). An easy way to know if a company prioritizes safety is to see if they track any safety KPIs such as:

  • Days since last incident
  • Number of regulatory violations
  • Annual change in percentage of training compliance
  • Annual change in the Total Case Incidence Rate (TCIR)

A company’s safety performance is the same as any other metric. Have you heard the saying,” what gets tracked is what gets done”?

When you track these safety KPIs, this information can be used in annual safety policy reviews of your manual. Use this information to see if there are incidents or close calls being repeated, or if the current manual and policies cause different hazards not planned for, or if there is something that changed in the last year that needs its own safe work practices.

Other Safety School articles that examine the more academic concepts of occupational safety:

  • OSHA Inspections
  • Contact Release Training for NFPA 70E 2015
  • Scaffolding Code of Safe Practices
  • Emergency Response Plans for Permit Required Confined Spaces
  • Spotlighting the Importance of Checklists
  • Details of a Fully Developed Emergency Action Plan
  • The Six Guiding Principles of an Industrial Hygienist
  • Exactly How Does A Safety Manual Protect Your Company in an Inspection?
  • Who Is Covered (Or Not) By OSHA

Spotting Safety: Scaffold Footing

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We focused on the toprail requirements of a supported scaffold in the last Spotting Safety article, so let’s look at where the scaffold meets the ground to see why this photo, of wood blocks shimmed underneath a scaffold leg, doesn’t meet OSHA regulations.

  • “Unstable objects shall not be used to support scaffolds or platform units.” 1926.451(c)(2)(ii)

OSHA defines unstable objects as items whose strength, configuration, or lack of stability may allow them to become dislocated and shift. Examples include: barrels, boxes, loose brick, and concrete blocks.

It’s too easy to imagine the scaffold moving just enough to cause the pole to slide off the top block. Or one of the blocks could just as easily get kicked out of the pile.

An adjustable screw jack on the bottom of this pole would provide a solid base with the concrete and allow a worker to dial in exactly the right height to ensure a level scaffold.

Speaking of which, the other bare pole can present its own problems.

  • “Supported scaffold poles, legs, posts, frames, and uprights shall bear on base plates and mud sills or other adequate firm foundation.” 1926.451(c)(2)

Attaching a metal base plate footing to the bottom of all scaffold frames is an easy way to ensure a sound foundation. In truth, base plates are not always necessary as long as the foundation is firm enough, and concrete is the one material that OSHA says doesn’t need to be evaluated by a competent person.

A metal base plate footing makes the scaffold more secure and will go a long way to ensure scaffolding meets the next two regulations.

  • “Footings shall be level, sound, rigid, and capable of supporting the loaded scaffold without settling or displacement.” 1926.451(c)(2)(i)

Although not an issue in this photo, this means that if the scaffold settles into the ground even with footings, then additional measures, such as mudsills may be necessary. It is up to the competent person, appointed by the business to make these decisions.

  • “Supported scaffold poles, legs, posts, frames, and uprights shall be plumb and braced to prevent swaying and displacement.” 1926.451(c)(3)

This regulation speaks to the competent person identifying all necessary ties, guys, braces, and outriggers to make sure a scaffold doesn’t tip, but also requires attention to the scaffold’s poles, legs, post frames, and uprights to ensure they will stay braced and plumb so they don’t sway or move.

All Spotting Safety Articles:

  • Excavation Cave-ins
  • Scaffolding Footing
  • Scaffolding Toprails
  • Earthmoving Equipment Training
  • Self Supporting Ladders
  • Forklift Counterweighting
  • Power Tool Trigger Guards

Spotting Safety: Earthmoving Equipment Training

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Although it’s impossible to discern exactly what led to this overturned skid steer, an experienced operator can tell you that it can be easy to upset earthmoving equipment like this. Because of the weighted back end, if you go too fast uphill or backwards downhill, and have the bucket lifted high enough to raise the center of gravity, you can pop a wheelie or roll completely over which makes having a proper earthmoving safety training kit important.

A correctly trained operator should know this.

OSHA forklift regulations explain the training required in 1910.178(l). It’s up to the employer to ensure their operators have successfully completed a training program under an instructor who has the knowledge, training, and experience to teach and evaluate the operator. Training should include formal instruction, practical training, and performance evaluations.

Truck related topics include: operating instructions, warnings, precautions, differences between the truck and an automobile, controls and instrumentation, engine operation, steering and maneuvering, visibility, attachment operation, vehicle capacity and stability, inspections and maintenance, refueling/recharging, and operating limitations.

Other applicable OHSA regulations include:

  • The employer shall instruct each employee in the recognition and avoidance of unsafe conditions and the regulations applicable to his work environment to control or eliminate any hazards or other exposure to illness or injury. 1926.21(b)(2)
  • The employer shall permit only those employees qualified by training or experience to operate equipment or machinery. 1926.20(b)(4)

Because this vehicle moves earth, it isn’t automatically regulated under the General Industry Powered Industrial Trucks regulation 1910.178 (forklifts), but instead fits under 1926.602 for Construction Material Handling Equipment. And there, operator training requirements are identical to the PIT training requirements — 1926.602(d).

All Spotting Safety Articles:

  • Excavation Cave-ins
  • Scaffolding Footing
  • Scaffolding Toprails
  • Earthmoving Equipment Training
  • Self Supporting Ladders
  • Forklift Counterweighting
  • Power Tool Trigger Guards

Spotting Safety: Power Tool Trigger Guards

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I hope you’ve never seen this before: a zip lock used to lock down a trigger, either replacing a missing one or on a tool that was never meant to have a trigger lock.

Sure several hours of holding that trigger down while grinding away at a big job can be tiring, but this is not the answer for obvious reasons. Just lose your focus for a second on your grip and you have a dangerous power tool running without anybody controlling it. Or maybe you leave this tool plugged in when the power is out, and can come to life when power is supplied.

In short, only use trigger locks that are part of the power tool that are supposed to be there, and ensure they are used correctly. OSHA recommends constant control switches that have to be held down for the tool to operate, as the preferred device. OSHA is also specific about which tools can have an “on-off” control switch, a constant pressure switch or a “lock-on” control switch.

Tools may only be equipped with trigger locks if they can also be shut off in a single motion using the same finger or fingers. This zip lock clearly does not meet that requirement.

Also some hand-held power tools – circular saws, chain saws, and some percussion tools that don’t have actively locked accessories – can only have a constant pressure switch.

All Spotting Safety Articles:

  • Excavation Cave-ins
  • Scaffolding Footing
  • Scaffolding Toprails
  • Earthmoving Equipment Training
  • Self Supporting Ladders
  • Forklift Counterweighting
  • Power Tool Trigger Guards