Category: Industry

VIOLENCE IN THE WORKPLACE

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Violence in the workplace is one of those circumstances in which no one expects to ever find themselves. You know it happens. You read about it in the news but never think it could happen where you work.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries, there were 14,770 workplace homicides between 1992 and 2012. In 2013, there were 397 homicide victims; and, those fatalities accounted for 9 percent of all workplace deaths that year. While roadway incidents, falls from heights, and struck-by injuries are more common where workplace fatalities are concerned, 9 percent is far too many and should be enough to get you thinking about safety in your own workplace.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) defines workplace violence as “violence or the threat of violence against workers. It can occur at or outside the workplace and can range from threats and verbal abuse to physical assaults and homicides, one of the leading causes of job-related deaths.” With numerous ways to encounter violence in and around the workplace, only the right tools and training can help minimize risk.

Never assume workplace violence is unlikely, simply based on the nature of your work environment. Incidents occur in occupations across all industries. To assess your risk, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) suggests a few questions to ask yourself:

  • Do you work alone or with very few people?
  • Are you providing health care or health services?
  • Do you have coworkers who seem irritable or unstable?
  • Is money exchanged?
  • Do you work late-night or overnight?
  • Is your workplace located in a high crime area?
  • Does your workplace serve alcohol?

These conditions can increase the risk of workplace violence, but every workplace can provide a foundation for situational violence. Employees are human with unpredictable behaviors often brought on by unfavorable life circumstances. A coworker could be having problems at home, for example – divorce, loss of a family member, financial issues, etc. Unless you know what to look for, you may be unaware of how close they are to a violent outburst.

Workplace violence isn’t always related directly to a given workplace. Nearly 80 percent of workplace homicides come from outside of the business. Robberies, upset customers, domestic disputes that follow a coworker to the workplace, and violent events occurring in the vicinity are common.

Beyond the obvious impacts workplace violence has on its victims, there are business implications as well. Violent incidents cost businesses billions of dollars each year in necessary security increases, workers’ compensation, employee loss and downtime, damaged property, public relations, and psychological impairment.

So what can be done to reduce risk?

Not all workplace violence incidents can be predicted. Robberies, for example, can strike even in the safest, most affluent of neighborhoods. The best course of action is to develop a written workplace violence program which thoroughly details your business’ policies and procedures on the matter. For unpredictable incidents, you should implement a response and evacuation system and hold regular drills. These programs should include instructions for incidents that occur in and out of the work site (i.e. lockdowns indoors, or evacuations to an offsite location). Don’t forget to include zero-tolerance policies on workplace violence so employees know exactly what’s expected of them and the consequences in the event the policy(s) are not followed.

Some signs to watch for are irritability and poor response to criticism. Is your coworker experiencing problems at home? Consider establishing a reporting process for all employees and contractors to understand and follow. The process should include specific people designated as those to contact in the instance that a coworker in engaged in suspicious or dangerous behavior.

Examine the resources available from a management perspective. Consider offering counseling services so stressed or overworked employees can safely and confidently discuss their misconduct and find a suitable solution. Also, fostering a positive, pleasant work environment can go a long way as a preventative measure.

Workplace violence is best addressed before it happens through knowledge and proactive measures. Safety Services Company can help. Contact us today for information on how we can help you create a violence-free workplace.

Federal Laws on Employee Breaks: The Good and Bad News

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Federal Labor Law Breaks

In April, we ran an article about asphalt safety, giving some tips on how to stay safe while hazards like hot asphalt, vehicular traffic, complex machinery and heavy equipment are present. We received a comment, about federal labor law breaks, that raises issues not just on the risks of this job, but also on the complicated subject of employee breaks. Below is the comment from a.olechnowicz:

“Working as a flagger on a paving job for 10-14 hours straight without any breaks–this seems very unsafe, also flagging on freshly poured asphalt at 160 degrees in 95-100 degree outside temp—without any breaks. It becomes very difficult. Are there any OSHA guidelines covering this? Also, there is no training given on hazards of inhaling asphalt fumes.”

It is common belief that providing breaks to employees is fair; studies have also shown that breaks actually improve productivity. Also, they have found that employees who took 10- to 15-minute breaks every 2 hours accomplished more work than those who worked non-stop.

Although some of you might be aware of this reality, I bet others will find it a surprise.We bring you now our first serving of good and bad news:

Good news:

There’s actually a federal law that defines breaks. It’s the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

Bad news:

FLSA does not require employers to give ANY BREAKS to their employees.

This serving is not so hot, though. A lot has been said about it both on the web and off of it.Still, not everyone is aware that employers are not mandated by federal law to give breaks to their employees.Take note that we’re talking specifically about employees above the age of 18.

Good news:

There are 22 states that have laws including provisions for work breaks.

Bad news:

Only 19 of these 22 states require a meal or rest break for employees.Only 7 of the 19 require a rest break in addition to a meal break.

These 7 states are California, Colorado, Illinois, Kentucky, Minnesota, Nevada, Oregon and Washington. All of them require employers to provide paid rest periods.

Rest breaks or coffee breaks are paid and usually last 20 minutes or less.Meal breaks or lunch breaks are 30 minutes or longer. While they are considered unpaid, an employee must be relieved of all work duties.If they continue work while eating, the meal break would be considered paid.

Good news:

OSHA has a say on the issue of employee breaks.

Bad news:

They only give exceptions to highly hazardous jobs such as those done in nuclear plants and high-altitude steel erection jobs.

Surely this is a matter not to be taken lightly.After all, a lot of jobs out there might not be as hazardous as those done in nuclear plants and high-altitude steel erection jobs. But the fact remains that these jobs are hazardous.

Also, whether or not a job passes as hazardous in the standards of federal and state laws, no one can change the fact that employees are humans; they have physiological limitations.Come to think of it, even machines need a break; otherwise they’d end up getting damaged in no time.With humans most damages are irrevocable.

Good news:

FLSA acknowledges that some employers choose to give breaks to their employees as a “benefit”.

Bad news:

The fact remains that employers may not choose to give breaks.

The reality is simple yet bitter to swallow:Employees who work in states with no laws requiring breaks have to rely on their own employers to get this “benefit”. But this doesn’t mean that they should be at the losing end.

If you believe you deserve to have breaks in your job, you always have the choice to talk to your employer.This should go easier if you and your co-workers raise this issue together.

Now if you have breaks but you work in one of the states without a law requiring it, then your employer is voluntarily providing them.It means your employer can revoke this policy or make modifications in it at any time.

But if your employer violates break or meal provisions in the FLSA and/or state laws, you have the right to report this to your state labor department. You may also seek the help of a lawyer.

For now, we can only hope that more states pay greater attention to this complicated issue.Let’s also cross our fingers that more employers see breaks as a means to gaining higher productivity. Of course, all this comes with more hopes that we’ll have better news for employees in the future.

HEAT ILLNESS: AWARENESS AND PROTECTING WORKERS

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As we transition to warmer temperatures, it’s important to revisit your workplace’s Heat Illness Prevention Program to ensure your employees are equipped to combat heat-related stress and illnesses. Heat is the number one cause of weather-related fatalities in the United States despite the fact that most heat-related deaths are preventable.

Average high temperatures have seen a steady increase across the country over the past couple of decades. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) anticipates that average temperatures will continue to increase, and heat waves will become more frequent and impactful. This prediction should encourage all businesses to look at how their employees are exposed to high temperatures, and what they can do to accommodate.

Businesses with employees who perform work in moderate to high temperatures or humid conditions, especially where increased heart rate and perspiration are concerned, must be given the necessary tools to recognize, understand, and prevent heat stress illnesses.

Essentially, heat stress prevention comes down to workplace design, employee training, and effective work procedures. Design and procedures will vary greatly depending on geographical location and the type of work being performed. Businesses should keep in mind that heat stress can occur regardless of the time of year, in both outdoor and indoor conditions. Required personal protective equipment (PPE) can also have a significant impact on the body’s ability to expel heat. Workers involved with hazardous waste operations or asbestos removal, for example, are often required to wear impermeable protective equipment which can trap heat close to the body. A thorough risk assessment will help businesses identify risk elements such as these.

A strong working knowledge of how the body regulates heat, and how personal factors can affect that regulation, is an extremely valuable tool in prevention. The human body needs to maintain a core temperature between 96.8 (36) and 100.4 (38) degrees Fahrenheit to function at peak performance. Weather conditions, manual labor, and personal factors can cause the core temperature to increase, which can lead to the development of a series of heat-related illnesses.

To regulate internal temperature, the body uses two basic mechanisms. The first is to increase the heart rate which assists in moving blood and heat away from vital organs to the skin. The second is perspiration, during which the body expels heat in moisture through the pores, which then evaporates and carries heat away in the process. Personal factors, such as acclimatization, caffeine and alcohol consumption, hydration replenishment, general health, age, and certain prescription medications can affect how well these mechanisms work and should be taken into consideration before performing work in high temperatures. Perspiration is the more effective of the two mechanisms, which means that proper hydration to replenish fluids lost as sweat is absolutely essential.

There are four common disorders which surface as a result of heat stress, ranging from mild discomfort to life-threatening conditions:

Heat rash is the most common ailment which occurs while working in the heat. It is also called “prickly heat.” Symptoms include red, blotchy, itchy skin, particularly in areas of the body with high perspiration, and a prickling sensation. Rashes which aren’t cleaned thoroughly and frequently may become infected. Moving to a cool environment, cleaning the affected area with cool water, and complete drying are often effective treatments.

Heat cramps occur as a result of salt being lost through perspiration. They are painful muscle spasms causing lumps in the affected muscles, usually the back, legs, and arms. The pain can be severe enough to greatly inhibit movement. Workers should cease activities to tend to cramps as soon as they feel them. Stretching and massaging the affected muscle as well as replacing salt by drinking electrolyte replacement fluids are useful techniques in tending to heat cramps.

Heat exhaustion is a dangerous result of heat stress which can lead to a heat stroke if not treated promptly with first aid. It happens when the body is so overexerted that it cannot supply blood simultaneously to vital organs and the skin for temperature regulations. Inflicted workers may experience weakness, headache, breathlessness, nausea, vomiting, faintness, or loss of consciousness. Call 911 and move workers exhibiting these symptoms to a cool place and give them water to drink. Remove any clothing that isn’t necessary and loosen other clothing. Shower or sponge them down with cool water. It will take at least 30 minutes for the body to cool down after experiencing heat exhaustion.

Heat stroke is a disorder which requires immediate medical attention, and can lead rapidly to fatality if not treated quickly. A person experiencing a heat stroke may experience confusion, hot, dry skin, high body temperatures, lack of sweating, irrational behavior, convulsions, and/or a loss of consciousness. Call 911 right away and take the victim to a cool area to immerse or shower them with cool water. Wrap them in wet sheets and fan them until you can transport them to a hospital or an ambulance arrives.

Knowledge can mean the difference between life and death during a critical victimization of heat stress. Workers should understand the nature and symptoms of heat-related illnesses both in a sense of recognizing them in themselves, and when a coworker is suffering. In many cases, a quick and efficient response can save a heat stress victim from numerous long-term effects that would have otherwise occurred had symptoms gone untreated. Proper training and a strong Heat Stress Prevention Program will help protect worker health year round.

 

Walking Working Surfaces: Know the OSHA Rule Update

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Walking Working Surfaces OSHA Rule

On November 17, 2016, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a Final Walking Working Surfaces Rule, for the purpose of better protecting workers at risk of falls from heights or on the same level. The Rule updates and clarifies standards, and adds training and inspection requirements. It will incorporate technology advances, best practices, and national consensus standards. OSHA updated “1910 Subpart D – Walking-Working Surfaces” (also known for covering “slip, trip, and fall” hazards) and added personal fall protection system requirements to “1910 Subpart I – Personal Protective Equipment.”

The rule will affect a variety of workers in the General Industry, from painters to warehouse workers. It will not have an effect on Construction or Agriculture standards.

The idea is to get General Industry caught up to the fall protection procedures already in place in Construction and improved upon by industry best practices. These changes also affect the fall protection elements throughout the General Industry regulation such as: “Subpart F Powered Platforms, Manlifts, and Vehicle Mounted Work Platforms”, “Subpart I Personal Protective Equipment”, “Subpart N Materials Handling and Storage”, and “Subpart R Special Industries.”

OSHA Estimates

Annually, an average of 202,066 serious injuries and 345 fatalities occur as a result of falls from heights or the same level. By implementing this Final Rule, the agency hopes to prevent at least 5,842 serious injuries and 29 fatalities on average per year among affected workers. Employers are currently required to install guardrails as their primary method of fall protection; the Rule will allow those same employers to select their own fall protection system from an approved list of options to address specific fall hazards with targeted solutions.

The Final Rule

Will allow non-conventional fall protection methods in some situations, like low-slope roofs. Additionally, it will replace outdated General Industry scaffold standards with a requirement to follow the more current Construction scaffold standards, as well as phase out a dangerous exception for the outdoor advertising industry that allows qualified climbers to forego fall protection.

The General Industry

Will see updates to fall protection requirements in specific situations, such as hoist areas, runways, areas above dangerous equipment, wall openings, repair pits, stairways, scaffolds, and slaughtering platforms. Standards involving the performance, inspection, use, and maintenance of fall protection systems will see upgrades as well.

Under circumstances where fall protection is required (such as when individuals are working 4 feet or more above a lower level, or on runways, near wall openings or stairways, etc.), there are now numerous additional protection options. Here are some examples:

Guardrail System

A barrier along on unprotected side of a walking working surface.

Safety Net System

Stops falling workers before they hit a lower level or obstruction

Personal Fall Arrest System (PFAS)

A device (or combination of devices) which stops a fall before worker hits a lower level. It uses a body harness, anchorage, connector and even a combination of a lanyard, deceleration device, and lifeline. Body belts are not a PFAS.

Positioning System

A device which allows an employee to be suspended on a vertical surface and work hands free using a body harness or body belt.

Travel Restraint System

Eliminates the ability of falling off an unprotected edge using an anchorage, anchorage connector, lanyard, and body support.

Ladder Safety System

Eliminates or reduces the possibility of falling off a fixed ladder using a carrier, safety sleeve, lanyard, connectors, and body harness. Cages and wells are not a ladder safety system.

Rope Descent Systems

OSHA will mirror its current Powered Platforms standard by codifying Rope Descent Systems (RDS) used by window washers using a roof anchorage, support rope, descent device, carabiners, and a chair to perform work while suspended. Also, the Final Rule includes a 300-foot height limit for RDS use, and requires building owners to ensure in writing that anchorages have been tested, certified, and maintained to support 5,000 pounds per worker.

Ladder Safety Requirements

According to OSHA, 20 percent of workplace fatalities and injuries are a result of falls from ladders. To help remedy this, the Final Rule addresses fixed ladders, portable ladders, mobile ladder stands, and platforms. Current standards regarding the use of ladders in emergencies, or those which are an integral part of or are designed into a machine or equipment, will not be affected.

Fixed Ladders: These are permanently attached to a structure, building, or equipment. The Rule will phase in requirements for ladder safety systems or PFAS on fixed ladders which extend more than 24 feet, and phase out cages and wells.

Portable Ladders: Portable ladders are either self-supporting, or lean against a structure. The changes incorporated by the Rule focus on performance language rather than specification and design requirements. Examples include ensuring rungs and steps are slip resistant and that ladders are not placed on unstable bases, such as boxes or barrels.

Training

Employers who use personal fall protection and work in high hazard situations must be trained by a qualified person about fall and equipment hazards and fall protection systems so they can correctly:

  • Identify and minimize fall hazards
  • Use personal fall protection systems and rope descent systems
  • Maintain, inspect, and store fall protection equipment and systems

Retraining is required whenever:

  • Change in workplace operations
  • Change in equipment
  • A worker can benefit from additional training because of a lack of knowledge or skill

For help ensuring your business is prepared to incorporate the changes found in OSHA’s Final Rule, please visit www.safetyservicescompany.com.

Call (877) 849-1149 today to speak with one of our safety solutions experts.

 

What You Should Know About Silica Dust

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What are the Damaging Effects of Silica Dust?

Silica dust is an extremely common, and potentially hazardous, mineral compound found throughout numerous industries and applications across the globe. It exists in nature primarily as quartz, although in many areas it is a major component in sand. In fact, it is the second most common mineral in the earth’s crust. Occupationally, it affects approximately 2.3 million individuals in the United States alone. Any occupation which involves the handling or use of rock, brick, or sand, or participates in drilling, quarrying, or tunneling carries the risk of silica exposure. Inhaling crystalline silica dust can lead to debilitating and fatal lung cancers and diseases, most notably silicosis.

What Is Silicosis?

Silicosis is a lung affliction caused by breathing dust which contains fine particles of crystalline silica. If silica particles are inhaled, they become embedded in the lungs. The lung tissues then react by developing fibrotic nodules and scarring around the trapped particles. The scar tissue makes the lungs hard and stiff. Finally, this scarring can greatly reduce the function of the lungs, making it difficult and sometimes painful to breathe.

Most importantly, silicosis comes in three forms:

Chronic silicosis: The most common form of the disease, it may go undetected for years in the early stages. Chest X-rays may not reveal an abnormality until after 15 or 20 years of exposure. If you believe you are overexposed to silica dust, visit a doctor who knows about lung diseases. The progress of silicosis can only be stopped; but cannot be cured.

Accelerated silicosis: This type of silicosis tends to develop between 5 and 10 years after an exposure to high concentrations of crystalline silica dust. Examinations through x-rays and symptoms are often similar or exactly the same as chronic silicosis, but appear faster and accelerate quickly (hence the name).

Acute silicosis: Acute silicosis appears relatively rapidly after exposure to extreme amounts crystalline silica dust. There are recorded cases of patients showing signs of acute silicosis mere weeks after exposure. In these cases, symptoms are disabling and develop very quickly, including shortness of breath, weight loss, cough, and often imminent death.

History

Because of its abundance in nature, the use of silica has been in practice since ancient times in various applications. Its health risks – those that come primarily with exposure to silica dust inhalation – were first documented in 1700 by Dr. Bernardino Ramazzini (the man often credited with the advent of occupational medicine) when he recognized symptoms of silicosis in stone cutters.

In the early 1900s, Dr. Alice Hamilton saw the same connections between silicosis and the dust being inhaled by granite cutters. This discovery and the engineering demands that followed would set in motion an increased awareness of silica dangers across the globe. Today, occupational health and safety agencies all across North America strictly enforce regulations which limit and protect workers from silica dust exposure.

Symptoms of Silicosis

Because many cases silicosis do not develop until several years after exposure, patients may be slow to experience symptoms. This is why respirable silica dust exposure is so dangerous – there is very little to inform a worker there’s a problem until it’s too late. Once developed, symptoms may include:

  • Shortness of breath, worsened by physical exertion
  • Persistent and severe cough
  • Chest pain
  • Bluish skin
  • Fever
  • Rapid breathing
  • Weight loss and lack of appetite
  • Dark spots appearing in nail beds

Eventually, as the lungs’ ability to perform efficiently wanes, silica patients may require the support of oxygen-supplying or other respiration-assistance devices.

The three types of silicosis each affect the lungs in a slightly unique way:

Chronic silicosis will involve lung swelling and expansion of lymph nodes in the chest, which leads to difficulty breathing.

Patients of acute silicosis will experience severe inflammation of the lungs as well as the introduction of fluid, which creates severe loss of breath and lowered levels of blood oxygen.

The lungs of an accelerated silicosis patient will experience the same symptoms as chronic silicosis, except they will develop must faster.

Preventing Silicosis

There is no known cure for silicosis, but it is 100 percent preventable by utilizing silica safety procedures. Treatment options are limited, as physicians ordinarily simply instruct workers to permanently remove themselves from exposure zones, avoid respiratory irritants, and quit smoking. Silicosis often comes with respiratory infections, so antibiotics may also be prescribed.

That said, the best way to avoid the horrific and debilitating consequences of silicosis is to prevent it from occurring altogether. Employers who are involved with the use and handling of silica in the workplace are required by law to install various measures to ensure worker exposure is below a dangerous level, and it is the workers’ responsibility to abide by those measures.

Engineering controls such as ventilation systems, work displacement, or substitution with an equal-yet-less-hazardous material may be used. Workers should comply with and respect any installed systems. Additionally, handling dust properly when it’s created is important. Dust should never be cleaned with air or other procedures which could reintroduce it into the breathable atmosphere.

If respiratory protection is required, workers must undergo thorough medical examinations to determine their safe compatibility with respirators, and be trained in how to use, store, and maintain them.

Most importantly, workers should use any on-site facilities provided to ensure silica dust does not cross contaminate. A change of clothes is critical to avoid carrying silica dust home with you on your work clothes.

To summarize, Safety Services Company is committed to helping employers in the U.S. and Canada provide safe and healthful workplaces for their employees through innovative training programs. Learn how we can help neutralize the dangers of silica in your workplace by visiting www.safetyservicescompany.com.

Call (877) 673-4369 today to speak with one of our safety solutions experts.

Hauling Your Equipment to Safety

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Hauling in Construction

One of the most crucial but tricky tasks fleet managers handle is moving over-sized, heavy loads to different locations. This job is a very difficult task, and it could be very dangerous to someone lacking the right equipment and training. Hauling heavy, large loads requires the use of hauling in construction. This process also demands that the proper machinery is controlled by workers who are qualified, the right routes and permits, as well as compliance with set regulations, which vary in each state.

There are several different types of hauling equipment that can be used for building and construction. Some of the most typical types include cranes, bulldozers, forklifts, dump trucks, and excavators, as well as many others.

Cranes

Cranes possess a tower-like framework that is equipped with pulleys and cables that are used to lower and lift different materials and objects. In construction, cranes are either mounted on a truck or fixed to the ground. In order to operate this type of equipment, it is best to have a qualified operator do so through radio-type controls, or from a control station cab secured to the crane.

The most basic type of crane is a mobile crane, which consists of a steel truss or telescopic boom that is mounted on a mobile platform. The boom can be either raised or lowered by hydraulic cylinders or cables and is hinged at the bottom.

Bulldozers

Bulldozers are greatly impressive machines that are supplied with a dozer blade. Due to their size, bulldozers can maintain their functionality in extremely difficult terrains and have fantastic ground mobility. The machine’s wide tracks allow it to divide the dozer’s weight over large areas; which keeps it from sinking into sandy or muddy ground.

A bulldozer’s torque divider abilities and ground hold are made to convert the engine’s power into dragging capabilities, which allows it to use its own weight to move heavy objects and remove others from the ground. Because of these traits, bulldozers are most often used to clear several types of obstacles, such as shrubbery and debris.

Forklifts

This type of construction machinery is also referred to as a forklift truck – a power-packed piece of industrial equipment that’s main function is to transport and lift different objects or materials with the steel forks attached underneath the load. Forklifts are often used to move loads and equipment that are stored in pallets. Made in the 1920s, forklifts have a broad range of load capabilities and are made in several different types. However, the counterbalance is the most typical.

Dump Trucks

The main intention of dump trucks is moving loose material, such as gravel, sand, and dirt for construction purposes. A traditional dump truck is equipped with a hydraulically controlled open box bed that is hinged at the back of the truck, while the front of the box rises to let the box’s contents fall out easily. There are several other types of dump trucks, such as semi-trailer dump trucks, off-road dump trucks, and transfer dump trucks.

Excavators

A hydraulic excavator is different from other pieces of equipment, due to the fact that its movements are made through the transfer of hydraulic fluid. Excavators are usually seen in residential areas, specifically when digging plays a massive role in a construction project. Compact excavators have increased in popularity because of their ability to fit nearly anywhere. These machines are also equipped with different attachments. These include breakers, augers, compactors, and clamps, which make them an adaptable piece of hauling equipment.

Call (888) 247-6133 today to speak with one of our safety solutions experts about equipment hauling in construction.

Solar Energy Safety

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Photovoltaic (PV) energy systems that take advantage of solar energy are still a small, but rapidly growing energy source in this country. And because of its ability to generate electricity right where it will be used, it will continue to be a popular choice for businesses. Yet, this quality of distributed energy creates more challenges and opportunities for hazards. Traditional power plants are kept behind fences, located far away from the public. But this distributed generation of solar power, puts power plants next to residences and businesses.

With 1,000 volt system on the roofs of many homes, personal solar arrays have some potential for fire and electric shock.  They need to be correctly installed and maintained so they don’t catch fire. When incorrectly designed or installed by untrained installers they can cause fires and kill.

In 2009 a PV system at a Target in California caught fire because of an expanding and loose conduit connector that had very long runs of about 400 feet and incorrect expansion joints and pinched conductors that led to an undetected ground fault during construction.

Design failures and poor installation similar to this often make the fire difficult to put out. When an electrician was called to the site to open the fuses, there were no DC disconnects to the roof.

Such high profile incidents have caused the National Electric Code (NEC) to address solar arrays.

Before the 2008 NEC, addressing solar PV was unclear and problematic to interconnect such as bus bar ratings. The 2008 NEC release created a good foundation for this technology.

The 2011 NEC addressed: DC safety through the clearance of conductors below the roof, grouping conductors from separate systems (AC, DC), requiring an Arc Fault Circuit Interrupter (AFCI) in the inverter, disconnecting means for replacing fuses, arc-fault detection on rooftops, and 1,000V systems.

Some of the changes in the 2014 NEC include: better ground fault protection, rapid shutdown of the DC system more than 10 feet outside the array, more flexibility of the interconnection point (bus or conductor rating), AFCI everywhere including the AC side, easier implementation of 1,000V systems, greater than 1,000V for non-residential systems, an auxiliary grounding electrode conductor (GEC) for the array, and required grouping of conductors (DC/AC).

This is a constantly evolving technology that will continue to progress and present additional safety hazards and solutions. The next challenge will be storing energy in large batteries so the electricity can better be used when needed.

Marijuana Use vs. Fit for Duty

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Workplaces are feeling the effects of both medical and recreational marijuana legalization. These new laws are making it more difficult to discipline someone who tests positive for marijuana. Ambiguous language protects impaired drivers from prosecution and makes it hard for employers to prove impairment at work.

Unlike alcohol, a test that shows level of marijuana impairment is not available. Instead a person can test positive weeks after using marijuana. One alternative approach to simply banning marijuana use as a component of the company drug and alcohol policy is to cover impairment in the safety policy under fitness for duty.

Start off by requiring employees disclose when they start taking any drug that causes impairment when working a safety sensitive job. This can be marijuana or a cold medicine, and the employee doesn’t have to disclose the drug or medical condition.

Be sure to update all job descriptions to define all safety sensitive jobs in compliance, by just listing essential job functions. Have a policy that states when an employee works in a safety sensitive job they should be able to work in a constant state of alertness and in a safe manner, and disclose when they have taken an impairing effect prescription or other substance.

Then the employer has the right to make a fitness for duty determination or send the employee to an occupational doctor for a fitness for duty evaluation with a copy of the job description. If it comes back that they are impaired and didn’t tell you, then you can manage that under your safety policy, and not your drug policy.

Make sure that all employees have a copy of the written company policy and education on drug and alcohol abuse that includes where to get more information. Supervisors need recurrent training on the effects of drugs and alcohol and how to determine reasonable suspicion.

Everybody needs to know the company position on medical and recreational marijuana and other prescription drug use through a consistent and proactive policy that includes appropriate testing.

PART 2: DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE – POSSIBLE?

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The strong cultural presence, acceptance and legality of alcohol make it easy to forget what an impact it can have on health. In 2014, according to the World Health Organization, there were over 300,000 alcohol-related deaths in the United States alone, and over 3 million worldwide.

In 2013, over 10,000 people were killed in traffic collisions where alcohol was involved, accounting for 31 percent of all vehicle fatalities. To understand how profoundly drinking alcohol can affect the safety of a workplace, it’s important to learn how it affects the body. When we drink, alcohol’s active ingredient, ethanol, is absorbed into the blood stream and begins to interrupt chemical processes in the brain that ordinarily allow it to function normally. Contrary to popular belief, alcohol doesn’t actually kill brain cells but rather damages nerve cell endings, which bring messages to the cells, leading to a change in overall brain function.

Typical symptoms of alcohol consumption often include slurred speech, clumsiness, and slowed reflexes, all highly dangerous conditions, especially in situations where hazardous work is concerned. Brain function is only a small area affected by alcohol – it can damage the heart, liver, and pancreas as well, and has been linked to several forms of cancer.

The consumption of alcohol can bring extreme hazards to every workplace environment; however, the associated risks are heightened where hazardous machine operation or vehicle use are required.

Additionally, workers who drink heavily are more likely to work at reduced capacity and call in sick, leading to losses in productivity. Workplace effects are noticeable even when alcohol is consumed by a worker the night before a given work day.

How long can alcohol remain in our system? It can vary, depending on multiple factors: body weight and body fat affect the rate of alcohol absorption. Alcohol can be detected through urine testing and, considering the amount of alcohol ingested, can still be evident up to four days after consumption.

In order to protect workers from the harmful effects of alcohol-related incidents in the workplace, a Drug Free Workplace Program (DFWP) with associated training is necessary.

To find out more about how Safety Services Company can help develop a DFWP unique to your business, visit safetyservicescompany.com.

6 New Things You Must Know About ISNetworld®

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Contractor Management

What is ISNetworld?

Bringing any third party auditor account to a 100% score can be a daunting and time consuming task. Understanding the 6 Common Questions about ISNetworld is our way of giving you a piece of free advice and hopefully aid you in effectively maintaining your account. However, we know this requires time, money, and close attention. But the benefits of properly utilizing a third party auditor more than outweigh the cons!  Read on to find out: What is ISNetworld?

1.    What are RAVS?

RAVS stands for the Review and Verification Services section of your account. Here, you upload your safety program. Generally, most accounts can have anywhere from 16-40 programs that need to be custom written and submitted for review. We are experts at creating these programs and have the most experience with clients on ISNetworld. With our industry knowledge, we customize each program for your company to comply with your ISNetworld account. Safety Services Company can take care of all of your RAVS needs, call our RAVS Compliance experts now.

2.   What are T-RAVS Then?

T-RAVS is the training portion associated with the Review and Verification Service for ISNetworld. Safety Services Company can help you, every step of the way, with your T-RAVS. We can provide you with the forms, guidance on the best way to train your workers, and we upload the documentation to ISNetworld. Contact us now for a FREE consultation.

3.   Wait, MSQ What?

This is very similar to pre-qualification questionnaires some of the many owner clients may have sent you before you started working for them. The MSQ however is composed of over 2300+ questions that go over your work industry, safety programs, OSHA statistics, DOT, certifications, Drug & Alcohol, and many other components. This Questionnaire is completed to best reflect your business and how it measures up to the standards set by your client. Our industry experts have extensive knowledge in completing these questionnaires based on the types of work you perform. Get Started Now so we work with you to meet you client’s requirements and expectations establishing a well-documented MSQ that properly reflects your company.

4.    How do we train Employees on ISNetworld?

It is critical that your workers understand the minimum legislative requirements regarding the safety issues in the areas they work. ISNetworld and your upstream clients want to increase the level of safety and decrease the occurrence of accidents. The ISNetworld RAVS process is a facilitator to that. Safety Services Company is available to assist you with the field implementation of any new policy, Contact one of our Training Experts today.

5.   I received an ISNetworld Letter?

This suddenly lands in your mailbox, “We are pleased to announce (COMPANY) has recently established a business relationship with ISNetworld to further enhance our contractor/supplier management program. As a result of this action, contractors/suppliers and their subcontractors performing services for (COMPANY YOU WANT TO KEEP WORKING FOR) are required to become subscribers to ISNetworld.”

What is ISNetWorld? We know there can be many questions as to why you received this letter and what happens from here. After receiving your ISNetworld® Letter we are here to help you through the process of getting ISNetworld® compliant!

6.   How fast can you get me compliant with ISNetworld?

If you would do all of the ISNetworld compliance by yourself we highly recommend hiring a full-time employee to take care of it, alternative you can take advantage of Safety Services Companies Compliance Service Specialists that are trained to maintain your ISNetworld account for you 24/7 saving you time, money and resources. Finally, use your account to its full capacity – be safe, and make more money!

What is ISNetworld? We know. Call (888) 998-6430 today to speak with one of our safety solutions experts.

*Safety Services Company is an independently owned company, specializing in compliance with Third-Party Prequalification Providers such as ISNetworld®, PEC Premier®, Avetta®/PICS®, Complyworks® and CQN®. Safety Services Company is in no way sponsored or affiliated with ISNetworld®, PEC Premier®, or Avetta®/PICS Auditing®. ISN®, ISNetworld®, RAVS® , SSQ®, PQF® are registered trademarks of ISN Software Corporation®, PEC Premier®, and Avetta®/PICS Auditing®.